Talk:Terms of use/Creative Commons 4.0

Latest comment: 7 years ago by Zazpot in topic Support
This consultation is now closed. Thank you for your input!

This discussion started on 5 October 2016, and ran until 8 November 2016.

The Legal team may answer remaining questions in the coming weeks.

(Help with translations!)

We are asking for your input on a proposed change to the Wikimedia Terms of Use, namely to use the latest version of the Creative Commons license. This proposal will be available for at least the next thirty days (until November 8, 2016).

The copyright license on the Wikimedia projects makes it easy for everyone to access, share, and remix the material on our site. We've prepared a note explaining some of the changes for Wikimedia in the 4.0 version of the Creative Commons license.

To get involved, browse the comments made below and participate there.

If you have additional questions or thoughts, please click here to join the discussion below. We look forward to your comments.

This process is not a vote.

If you just wish to voice your agreement, but do not wish to make a long comment, please add it here: support, opposition, neutral.

(Help with translations!)

Creative Commons 4.0 upgrade

Frequently asked questions

(Help with translations!)

How will this affect Wikipedia?

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Wikipedia will continue to be available freely with attribution and sharealike requirements. Wikipedia is currently available under the 3.0 version of the license, and this upgrade will mean that new additions are submitted under the 4.0 version. People who use content from Wikipedia will continue to be able to provide attribution as currently described in the Wikimedia Terms of Use.

What is different between Creative Commons 3.0 versus 4.0?

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The license will continue to have the same basic requirements—providing appropriate credit and distribute remixes under the same license.

In the legal note, we highlight some of the most important differences for Wikimedia, including new official translations, increased readability, a revised description of the attribution requirement, an opportunity to correct license violations, and more. Creative Commons has also published a comparison of the changes in the license.

How can we "upgrade" the license?

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If we choose to amend the Terms of Use, the 4.0 version of the license will apply to new edits submitted to Wikimedia projects. After a page has been edited, it can be reused under the latest version of the license according to the attribution requirements in the Terms of Use. Revisions of pages before the upgrade to the 4.0 version will continue to be available under the version 3.0 of the license.

Was the 3.0 version available in other languages?

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CC BY-SA 3.0 did not have official translations of the unported license text, although it had translated license deeds and a number of international ports. The ported versions of CC BY-SA 3.0 were substantially similar to each other, but included some legal modifications to reflect the local jurisdiction. Creative Commons' new license translation policy will allow them to set official translations of the version 4.0 license. CC BY-SA 4.0 International is intended to be legally effective everywhere.

How will this affect English Wikinews and other projects that don't currently use CC BY-SA 3.0?

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English Wikinews may upgrade to CC BY 4.0 International, without adopting the version 3.0 of the license. Projects may continue to opt-out of the default license where appropriate.

How will this affect Wikidata (which currently uses CC0)?

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Wikidata will continue to use CC0 for contributions, which will make it easy to add and share factual data on the project.

Why do the proposed amendment to the terms of use mention sui generis database rights?

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CC BY-SA 4.0 International includes new requirements for database rights, in jurisdictions where those rights exist. To avoid introducing new ambiguity around the requirements for factual contributions of data sets, which may be covered by database rights in certain jurisdictions, we've proposed waiving these rights under the license. This is outlined in more detail in the legal note.

Can I use version 4.0 for images and other non-text contributions?

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Yes! You can upload media to Wikimedia Commons under the 4.0 version of the license.

Why does Wikipedia use a "sharealike" license like CC BY-SA?

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The sharealike clause in the CC BY-SA license helps promote the values of free culture. It asks users to continue to share their improvements and modifications to works that are offered to them freely under the Creative Commons license.

If the license were just CC BY (without a sharealike clause), people would be able to use content from the Wikimedia projects for any purpose, but if they made changes, they could put those changes under additional copyright restrictions and forbid others to use them. The ideal is to make the world's knowledge available for everyone, and using a license that makes sure contributions to that knowledge remain available for everyone helps work toward that goal.

When deciding which license to use, the Wikimedia community for the most part chose CC BY-SA instead of BY because the CC BY-SA license helps promote the values of free culture, as described in Creative Commons's statement of intent for the attribution-sharealike licenses. For historical reasons, the CC BY-SA license was also chosen for its compatibility with Wikipedia's previous GNU Free Document License. Some other projects, such as English Wikinews, choose to use the use the CC BY license.

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General support and opposition

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Collapsing and transcluding to make the discussions easier to access. Joe Sutherland (WMF) (talk) 21:41, 20 October 2016 (UTC)Reply

Support

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  1.   Support I support a straight upgrade to the latest license.
    • Fair enough, but that's not what the proposed new terms would give you. They would also impose this unnecessary and objectionable clause: "Where you own Sui Generis Database Rights covered by CC BY-SA 4.0, you waive these rights. As an example, this means facts you contribute to the projects may be reused freely without attribution." That clause overrides important attribution provisions present in CC BY-SA 4.0, and would in effect create a confusing crayon license. Far from a straight license upgrade! Zazpot (talk) 01:07, 8 November 2016 (UTC)Reply
  2.   Support I'm TheLBall and I approve this license.
    • Fair enough if you approve of CC BY-SA 4.0, but that's not quite what the proposed new terms would give you. They would also impose this unnecessary and objectionable clause: "Where you own Sui Generis Database Rights covered by CC BY-SA 4.0, you waive these rights. As an example, this means facts you contribute to the projects may be reused freely without attribution." That clause overrides important attribution provisions present in CC BY-SA 4.0, and would in effect create a confusing crayon license. Far from a straight license upgrade! Zazpot (talk) 01:07, 8 November 2016 (UTC)Reply
  3.   Strong support Yup.
  4.   Support- - I encourage the change to CC 4.0! -i have read it and think it is great.
    • Fair enough if you approve of CC BY-SA 4.0, but that's not quite what the proposed new terms would give you. They would also impose this unnecessary and objectionable clause: "Where you own Sui Generis Database Rights covered by CC BY-SA 4.0, you waive these rights. As an example, this means facts you contribute to the projects may be reused freely without attribution." That clause overrides important attribution provisions present in CC BY-SA 4.0, and would in effect create a confusing crayon license. Far from a straight license upgrade! Zazpot (talk) 01:07, 8 November 2016 (UTC)Reply
  5.   Support Being clearer and more international in scope are surely good things. Iadmc (talk) 16:57, 29 October 2016 (UTC)Reply
    • Fair enough if you approve of CC BY-SA 4.0, but that's not quite what the proposed new terms would give you. They would also impose this unnecessary and objectionable clause: "Where you own Sui Generis Database Rights covered by CC BY-SA 4.0, you waive these rights. As an example, this means facts you contribute to the projects may be reused freely without attribution." That clause overrides important attribution provisions present in CC BY-SA 4.0, and would in effect create a confusing crayon license. Far from a straight license upgrade! Zazpot (talk) 01:07, 8 November 2016 (UTC)Reply
  6.   Support Yes--Walts0042 (talk) 15:36, 24 October 2016 (UTC)dReply
  7.   Weak support - This does not seem to change much, but I think we should use the latest Creative Commons license because Wikimedia may get in trouble otherwise. --RafChem (talk) 16:26, 23 October 2016 (UTC)Reply
    • First of all, Wikimedia won't get in trouble for sticking with the existing terms. Secondly: fair enough if you approve of CC BY-SA 4.0, but that's not what the proposed new terms would give you. They would also impose this unnecessary and objectionable clause: "Where you own Sui Generis Database Rights covered by CC BY-SA 4.0, you waive these rights. As an example, this means facts you contribute to the projects may be reused freely without attribution." That clause overrides important attribution provisions present in CC BY-SA 4.0, and would in effect create a confusing crayon license. Far from a straight license upgrade! Zazpot (talk) 01:07, 8 November 2016 (UTC)Reply
  8.   Support - I am pro this move simply because it will help consolidate Wikipedia with general best practice and the latest, and commonly-used, CC 4.0 standard.--O-Jay (talk) 04:31, 23 October 2016 (UTC)Reply
    • First of all, CC BY-SA 3.0 is still very common, and still best practice insofar as it enables interoperability with other CC BY-SA 3.0-licensed resources (e.g. Stack Overflow). Secondly: fair enough if you approve of CC BY-SA 4.0, but that's not quite what the proposed new terms would give you. They would also impose this unnecessary and objectionable clause: "Where you own Sui Generis Database Rights covered by CC BY-SA 4.0, you waive these rights. As an example, this means facts you contribute to the projects may be reused freely without attribution." That clause overrides important attribution provisions present in CC BY-SA 4.0, and would in effect create a confusing crayon license. Far from a straight license upgrade! Zazpot (talk) 01:07, 8 November 2016 (UTC)Reply
  9.   Support - It will really be a great help and support to the world at large.
  10.   Support - It is great to hear that wikipedia taking a step towards licensing. Because their are several articles like movies which have a suspense stories but their suspense is revealed in the wikipedia articles. If people read it on the wikipedia who will watch the entire movie to catch the suspense? It also same for the suspense books, if the content of books is on the wikipedia articles then it is the violation of the copyrights of author. So, I thank wikipedia if they make it upgrade to creative commons 4.0 nikhilkale564 (talk) 12:06, 19 October 2016 (UTC)Reply
    • Fair enough if you approve of CC BY-SA 4.0, but that's not quite what the proposed new terms would give you. They would also impose this unnecessary and objectionable clause: "Where you own Sui Generis Database Rights covered by CC BY-SA 4.0, you waive these rights. As an example, this means facts you contribute to the projects may be reused freely without attribution." That clause overrides important attribution provisions present in CC BY-SA 4.0, and would in effect create a confusing crayon license. Far from a straight license upgrade! Zazpot (talk) 01:07, 8 November 2016 (UTC)Reply
  11.   Support - Great improvement, would be great to have the liscense available in multiple languages.
  12.   Support Sounds good.
  13.   Support Great improvement!
  14.   Support I've read it all and I think it's an improvement from the previous terms.
  15. This is a very important change. Internationalization without ports—one of the newest changes for the Creative Commons Attribution–ShareAlike License—is absolutely necessary for the Wikimedia Foundation and its projects.
    • Fair enough if you approve of CC BY-SA 4.0, but that's not quite what the proposed new terms would give you. They would also impose this unnecessary and objectionable clause: "Where you own Sui Generis Database Rights covered by CC BY-SA 4.0, you waive these rights. As an example, this means facts you contribute to the projects may be reused freely without attribution." That clause overrides important attribution provisions present in CC BY-SA 4.0, and would in effect create a confusing crayon license. Far from a straight license upgrade! Zazpot (talk) 01:07, 8 November 2016 (UTC)Reply
  16.   Support I (and 22 others) agree. We use wikipedia for academic purposes, but we can't use the licenses. This would be a great improvement to Wikipedia. Jerryzhu2004 (talk) 11:20, 16 October 2016 (UTC)Reply
  17. Este es un cambio muy importante. Internacionalización sin cambios locales — uno de los cambios más nuevos para la Licencia Creative Commons Atribución–CompartirIgual — es necesario absolutamente para la Wikimedia Foundation y sus proyectos. Signed off by:/Firmado por: 2601:602:101:8358:950A:90AD:9BB7:9138 03:23, 13 October 2016 (UTC)Reply
  18. Seems good to me, especially because of the internationalization ThomasBur (talk) 23:33, 13 October 2016 (UTC)Reply
  19. I am against this decision. Period. (Disapprove.)
  20.   Support For those items that are not otherwise encumbered.
  21. I support this change since it brings more clarity to the license and also includes internationalization.
  22.   Support It's an improvement) for those reasons. Nikolaiho (talk) 02:55, 12 October 2016 (UTC)Reply
    • Fair enough if you approve of CC BY-SA 4.0, but that's not quite what the proposed new terms would give you. They would also impose this unnecessary and objectionable clause: "Where you own Sui Generis Database Rights covered by CC BY-SA 4.0, you waive these rights. As an example, this means facts you contribute to the projects may be reused freely without attribution." That clause overrides important attribution provisions present in CC BY-SA 4.0, and would in effect create a confusing crayon license. Far from a straight license upgrade! Zazpot (talk) 01:07, 8 November 2016 (UTC)Reply
  23.   Strong support Important to start using a creative commons license that is clearer, includes databases rights and is therefore more suitable for worldwide use. Mtmlan84 (talk) 07:30, 11 October 2016 (UTC)Reply
    • Fair enough if you approve of CC BY-SA 4.0, but that's not quite what the proposed new terms would give you. They would also impose this unnecessary and objectionable clause: "Where you own Sui Generis Database Rights covered by CC BY-SA 4.0, you waive these rights. As an example, this means facts you contribute to the projects may be reused freely without attribution." That clause overrides important attribution provisions present in CC BY-SA 4.0, and would in effect create a confusing crayon license. Far from a straight license upgrade! Zazpot (talk) 01:07, 8 November 2016 (UTC)Reply
  24.   Strong support wikipedia provides information that i have not always been able to access.
  25.   Support As far as I can tell the complaints in the oppose section have been either entirely wrong or misunderstood. For example, this vote isn't about changing the license of an existing content, but more about what any new content will encompass. So it does not make sense to oppose this. Also, the CC license does not necessarily apply as well to images and videos, as pointed out below. So the "privacy" concern, which was a rather tenuous and unconvincing argument, is not valid. Finally, some who are in opposition have expressed antipathy towards 'all' copyright, which clearly includes open/copyleft licenses like CC-SA. But opposing those because you want "maximum openness" makes little sense, as openness is the entire point of copyleft licenses like CC-SA. Copyleft is literally as open as you can get and certainly more open than the public domain. Because of the way legal systems work, things in the public domain can be simply stolen/claimed/removed without any right to challenge. Copyleft is as open as you can possibly get,legally enforcing openness. I would not wish Wikipedia to lose copyleft and that must never be allowed to happen. I don't object to CC-3 and CC-4 being copyleft, but rather support Wikipedia's use of them because they are just that. I would not contribute to Wikipedia if the content wasn't copyleft licensed. These are my main opposing arguments for this change. I trust the preceding paragraph makes it obvious why I am far from convinced by them. I therefore support the move to version 4. Edit: I'm the guy who originally wrote this paragraph, and I just want to say that someone has tampered with it. It's been edited to make the grammar way worse and change the wording.
    • Fair enough if you approve of CC BY-SA 4.0, but that's not quite what the proposed new terms would give you. They would also impose this unnecessary and objectionable clause: "Where you own Sui Generis Database Rights covered by CC BY-SA 4.0, you waive these rights. As an example, this means facts you contribute to the projects may be reused freely without attribution." That clause overrides important attribution provisions present in CC BY-SA 4.0, and would in effect create a confusing crayon license. Far from a straight license upgrade! Zazpot (talk) 01:07, 8 November 2016 (UTC)Reply
  26.   Strong support Czuję, że społeczność naprawdę chciałbym to tak pójdę z nim
  27.   Support Appears to cover all the bases. Bring it on! Mashford42 (talk) 11:23, 10 October 2016 (UTC)Reply
  28.   Strong support Free the information for everyone!
  29.   Strong support Nyess --68.148.52.51 15:04, 10 October 2016 (UTC)Reply
  30. I   Support it would be great
  31. I   Support this move clarity and accessability improvements are great.
  32. I   Support this because it might encourage more people to share and find knowladge, knowing they will get credit for doing so.
  33. I strongly   Support this - Ramesh Ramaiah talk 08:09, 9 October 2016 (UTC)
  34.   Strong support -- Yes, this sounds like a positive thing. I support it.
  35. Support I support strongly the proposed changes and believe they are overdue.
  36.   Strong support -- Yes, this sounds like a positive thing. I support it.
  37.   Strong support -- I strongly support the change. Although I agree that waiving moral rights is a critical point in principle (as many opponents emphasize), I think that a contribution to Wikipedia should always be "encyclopedian", and therefore not personally or morally preserved!
  38.   Support I think you should look at it positive, the site itselfs remains the same but for authors this can make a difference, so defenitely worth it!
  39.   Support I agree to the change
  40.   Support Sounds great! Good job adding clarity to it and letting us know about the change.
  41.   Support Sounds great! -Stormo
  42.   Support Sounds good to me; Thanks for the opportunity to review the proposed change.
  43.   Support Sounds like a versy sensible change to me. Thanks for the open consultation.
  44.   Support This has been a difficult one and taken some thought and consideration, One will go with agree and will also consider it as a yes. However do feel we need some form of consideration with regards Copyright and Extraterritoriality status with Wiki.
  45.   Support I agree to move to Creative Commons 4.0 and think it is overdue
    • Fair enough if you approve of CC BY-SA 4.0, but that's not quite what the proposed new terms would give you. They would also impose this unnecessary and objectionable clause: "Where you own Sui Generis Database Rights covered by CC BY-SA 4.0, you waive these rights. As an example, this means facts you contribute to the projects may be reused freely without attribution." That clause overrides important attribution provisions present in CC BY-SA 4.0, and would in effect create a confusing crayon license. Far from a straight license upgrade! Zazpot (talk) 01:31, 8 November 2016 (UTC)Reply
  46.   Support These terms are fair and indeed will increase the amount international content.
  47.   Support I'm inclined to trust Wikimedia's preference on this. My only slight concern is as discussed in Waiving moral rights means waiving right of attribution. Wikipedia:Moral rights appear complicated and, in many circumstances good, but in these circumstances of attempting to share knowledge for the benefit of all, not important.--Jojairus (talk) 09:14, 7 October 2016 (UTC)Reply
  48.   Support I agree --Aberl Julian Johannes (talk) 08:56, 7 October 2016 (UTC)Reply
  49.   Support I agree to the change --DerHisto (talk) 06:55, 7 October 2016 (UTC)Reply
  50.   Support I agree to the change because an international and more readable and accessible license strongly correspond with Wikipedias goals. The license also gives a bit more freedom to re-users. One thing that I am not decided on is the 30-day correction time. One the positive side of things, it gives people, who may not have been aware that they violated the license an opportunity to correct the mistake - this would, of course, be assuming good intent -, but those without good intent could just hope they are not discovered and if they are, well, they won't get into any trouble, because they still have the opportunity to fix it. There is already enough violations of the license, we don't need to encourage more. I agree to the change anyhow, though my last point should definitely be considered in the final decision if there are more opposition. --GABRIEL FILMSTUDIOS (talk) 19:16, 6 October 2016 (UTC)Reply
    • Fair enough if you (mostly) approve of CC BY-SA 4.0, but that's not quite what the proposed new terms would give you. They would also impose this unnecessary and objectionable clause: "Where you own Sui Generis Database Rights covered by CC BY-SA 4.0, you waive these rights. As an example, this means facts you contribute to the projects may be reused freely without attribution." That clause overrides important attribution provisions present in CC BY-SA 4.0, and would in effect create a confusing crayon license. Far from a straight license upgrade! Zazpot (talk) 01:31, 8 November 2016 (UTC)Reply
  51.   Support Why Not? Makes sense to me. I think CC should become the standard for licensing all works. A world where everything can't be reused is terrible. Totally Swich! --Johnnyg150 (talk) 18:31, 6 October 2016 (UTC)Reply
  52.   SupportI support this cuz im smart and dont want people stealing my work-TheGuyFromM.I.T.
    • Fair enough if you approve of CC BY-SA 4.0, but that's not quite what the proposed new terms would give you. They would also impose this unnecessary and objectionable clause: "Where you own Sui Generis Database Rights covered by CC BY-SA 4.0, you waive these rights. As an example, this means facts you contribute to the projects may be reused freely without attribution." That clause overrides important attribution provisions present in CC BY-SA 4.0, and would in effect create a confusing crayon license. Far from a straight license upgrade! Zazpot ([[User
  53.   SupportI very much support this. Cavestory116 (talk) 17:24, 6 October 2016 (UTC)Reply
  54. (Italian) Mi piace tanto questa idea. Spero venga approvata. Se ne parla anche sulla it.wikinews qui
  55. Sigan adelante con la idea, es maravillosa. Héctor Angel
  56.   Support For me it is a very good idea to change the licence to Creative Commons 4.0. --NiridyA (talk) 20:15, 5 October 2016 (UTC)Reply
    • Fair enough if you approve of CC BY-SA 4.0, but that's not quite what the proposed new terms would give you. They would also impose this unnecessary and objectionable clause: "Where you own Sui Generis Database Rights covered by CC BY-SA 4.0, you waive these rights. As an example, this means facts you contribute to the projects may be reused freely without attribution." That clause overrides important attribution provisions present in CC BY-SA 4.0, and would in effect create a confusing crayon license. Far from a straight license upgrade! Zazpot (talk) 01:31, 8 November 2016 (UTC)Reply
  57.   За. —Niklitov (talk) 20:26, 5 October 2016 (UTC) (Member of Wikimedia RU)Reply
  58. I recommend it. Tyseco (talk).
  59. I agree with the changes since the scope of work is going to be broaden--Owula kpakpo (talk) 20:50, 7 October 2016 (UTC)Reply
  60. Seriously, why not?— The preceding unsigned comment was added by A Wikipedian on Wikipedia (talk) 21:06, 5 October 2016 (UTC)Reply
  61. I would appreciate the change to v.4.0 --Bodhi-Baum (talk) 21:31, 5 October 2016 (UTC)Reply
    • Fair enough if you approve of CC BY-SA 4.0, but that's not quite what the proposed new terms would give you. They would also impose this unnecessary and objectionable clause: "Where you own Sui Generis Database Rights covered by CC BY-SA 4.0, you waive these rights. As an example, this means facts you contribute to the projects may be reused freely without attribution." That clause overrides important attribution provisions present in CC BY-SA 4.0, and would in effect create a confusing crayon license. Far from a straight license upgrade! Zazpot (talk) 01:31, 8 November 2016 (UTC)Reply
  62. I think this is a "no brainer", aka, obviously a good idea. --Bodysurfinyon (talk) 23:21, 5 October 2016 (UTC)Reply
    • Fair enough if you approve of CC BY-SA 4.0, but that's not quite what the proposed new terms would give you. They would also impose this unnecessary and objectionable clause: "Where you own Sui Generis Database Rights covered by CC BY-SA 4.0, you waive these rights. As an example, this means facts you contribute to the projects may be reused freely without attribution." That clause overrides important attribution provisions present in CC BY-SA 4.0, and would in effect create a confusing crayon license. Far from a straight license upgrade! Zazpot (talk) 01:31, 8 November 2016 (UTC)Reply
  63. It can bring some practical benefits for more openness and involving more commons to take part. Therefore, I say 'Yes'. But, I suggest to conclude all licenses before into this new category as parts belonging to this one, and give some declarations. It would not waste resources and energies Jason M. C., Han (talk) 14:39, 6 October 2016 (UTC)Reply
  64. I believe you should go to Creative Commons
  65. pienso que seria de gran aporte para los usuarios que buscamos contenidos bajo licencia, y que no tenemos la intención de afectar a los demás, sino darle crédito al autor de la obra y Poder reutilizarlo. 186.149.201.230 01:01, 6 October 2016 (UTC)Reply
  66. Yes absolutely! Upgrade Upgrade!
    • Fair enough if you approve of CC BY-SA 4.0, but that's not quite what the proposed new terms would give you. They would also impose this unnecessary and objectionable clause: "Where you own Sui Generis Database Rights covered by CC BY-SA 4.0, you waive these rights. As an example, this means facts you contribute to the projects may be reused freely without attribution." That clause overrides important attribution provisions present in CC BY-SA 4.0, and would in effect create a confusing crayon license. Far from a straight license upgrade! Zazpot (talk) 01:31, 8 November 2016 (UTC)Reply
  67. My name is Charles Kickham. I live in Hallandale Beach Florida. I like to be called Charlie. I support the move to Creative Commons 4.0. Good Luck!!!! Lol!!!! Thank you. Sincerely, Charlie Kickham.
  68. The licence should be updated to all of the Wikimedia projects, I support the change. Else it will not solve lot of problems.
    acagastya  ✉ Dicere Aliquid :) 03:01, 6 October 2016 (UTC)Reply
  69. For Aaron Swartz and For an Open Web idealism, let's support it!
    • Fair enough if you approve of CC BY-SA 4.0, but that's not quite what the proposed new terms would give you. They would also impose this unnecessary and objectionable clause: "Where you own Sui Generis Database Rights covered by CC BY-SA 4.0, you waive these rights. As an example, this means facts you contribute to the projects may be reused freely without attribution." That clause overrides important attribution provisions present in CC BY-SA 4.0, and would in effect create a confusing crayon license. Far from a straight license upgrade! Reducing the copyleft aspect would potentially work against Aaron's ideals. Zazpot (talk) 01:31, 8 November 2016 (UTC)Reply
  70. i think it is an important step forward. i come from an Oriental culture where traditionally, knowledge has been always in the public domain. Copyright and commercial exploitation of knowledge is an Western, capitalist concept.
  71. fully support, donate every year to Wiki and think this is a good move in the right direction
  72. I agree to move to Creative Commons 4.0
    • Fair enough if you approve of CC BY-SA 4.0, but that's not quite what the proposed new terms would give you. They would also impose this unnecessary and objectionable clause: "Where you own Sui Generis Database Rights covered by CC BY-SA 4.0, you waive these rights. As an example, this means facts you contribute to the projects may be reused freely without attribution." That clause overrides important attribution provisions present in CC BY-SA 4.0, and would in effect create a confusing crayon license. Far from a straight license upgrade! Zazpot (talk) 01:31, 8 November 2016 (UTC)Reply
  73. it's an Upgrade , an Improvement ! Wikipedia should've been available under CC 4.0 long ago. But it's not too late . let's do this ! :) MohammadtheEditor (talk) 04:39, 6 October 2016 (UTC)Reply
    • Fair enough if you approve of CC BY-SA 4.0, but that's not quite what the proposed new terms would give you. They would also impose this unnecessary and objectionable clause: "Where you own Sui Generis Database Rights covered by CC BY-SA 4.0, you waive these rights. As an example, this means facts you contribute to the projects may be reused freely without attribution." That clause overrides important attribution provisions present in CC BY-SA 4.0, and would in effect create a confusing crayon license. Far from a straight license upgrade! Zazpot (talk) 01:31, 8 November 2016 (UTC)Reply
  74. I really hope the censorship on many topics goes away one day on Wikipedia. Some topics facts are dead wrong and certain people or paid companies do this a lot! Changing the facts is a form of bullying! We the people desrve the truth about things. And yes I support the move to creative commons 4.0.
    • Fair enough if you approve of CC BY-SA 4.0, but that's not quite what the proposed new terms would give you. They would also impose this unnecessary and objectionable clause: "Where you own Sui Generis Database Rights covered by CC BY-SA 4.0, you waive these rights. As an example, this means facts you contribute to the projects may be reused freely without attribution." That clause overrides important attribution provisions present in CC BY-SA 4.0, and would in effect create a confusing crayon license. Far from a straight license upgrade! Zazpot (talk) 01:31, 8 November 2016 (UTC)Reply
  75. Yes, I will go with it. It's time to upgrade Creative Commons 4.0 - Mindcap (talk) 07:11, 6 October 2016 (UTC)Reply
    • Fair enough if you approve of CC BY-SA 4.0, but that's not quite what the proposed new terms would give you. They would also impose this unnecessary and objectionable clause: "Where you own Sui Generis Database Rights covered by CC BY-SA 4.0, you waive these rights. As an example, this means facts you contribute to the projects may be reused freely without attribution." That clause overrides important attribution provisions present in CC BY-SA 4.0, and would in effect create a confusing crayon license. Far from a straight license upgrade! Zazpot (talk) 01:31, 8 November 2016 (UTC)Reply
  76. I think the upgrade is for the better. So, go ahead and upgrade to CC4.
    • Fair enough if you approve of CC BY-SA 4.0, but that's not quite what the proposed new terms would give you. They would also impose this unnecessary and objectionable clause: "Where you own Sui Generis Database Rights covered by CC BY-SA 4.0, you waive these rights. As an example, this means facts you contribute to the projects may be reused freely without attribution." That clause overrides important attribution provisions present in CC BY-SA 4.0, and would in effect create a confusing crayon license. Far from a straight license upgrade! Zazpot (talk) 01:31, 8 November 2016 (UTC)Reply
  77. It's is good to have a new CC4. I think we should do that 27.3.254.167 11:05, 6 October 2016 (UTC)Reply
    • Fair enough if you approve of CC BY-SA 4.0, but that's not quite what the proposed new terms would give you. They would also impose this unnecessary and objectionable clause: "Where you own Sui Generis Database Rights covered by CC BY-SA 4.0, you waive these rights. As an example, this means facts you contribute to the projects may be reused freely without attribution." That clause overrides important attribution provisions present in CC BY-SA 4.0, and would in effect create a confusing crayon license. Far from a straight license upgrade! Zazpot (talk) 01:31, 8 November 2016 (UTC)Reply
  78. Update is not bad IMHO, but the authors shouldn't forget about their earlier slogan: "Free encyclopedia". Thank u. 212.193.78.27 11:13, 6 October 2016 (UTC)Reply
  79. I would support the change to 4.0. DisillusionedBitterAndKnackered (talk) 11:52, 6 October 2016 (UTC)Reply
    • Fair enough if you approve of CC BY-SA 4.0, but that's not quite what the proposed new terms would give you. They would also impose this unnecessary and objectionable clause: "Where you own Sui Generis Database Rights covered by CC BY-SA 4.0, you waive these rights. As an example, this means facts you contribute to the projects may be reused freely without attribution." That clause overrides important attribution provisions present in CC BY-SA 4.0, and would in effect create a confusing crayon license. Far from a straight license upgrade! Zazpot (talk) 01:31, 8 November 2016 (UTC)Reply
  80. 4.0比3.0更加完善,可避免钻空子等现象发生。G760420431 (talk) 11:57, 6 October 2016 (UTC)Reply
  81. Oui bien Tvtabit (talk) 12:05, 6 October 2016 (UTC)Reply
  82. I agree to licensing under creative commons.. :)
    • Fair enough if you approve of CC BY-SA 4.0, but that's not quite what the proposed new terms would give you. They would also impose this unnecessary and objectionable clause: "Where you own Sui Generis Database Rights covered by CC BY-SA 4.0, you waive these rights. As an example, this means facts you contribute to the projects may be reused freely without attribution." That clause overrides important attribution provisions present in CC BY-SA 4.0, and would in effect create a confusing crayon license. Far from a straight license upgrade! Zazpot (talk) 01:31, 8 November 2016 (UTC)Reply
  83. Provided the team thinks this is a stronger - more robust - free (as in free speech) version of clauses for open management, it seems pretty much a right move. Creative Commons are widely recognised here (Western Europe), largely accepted, a good stable starting point to expand :) Nice free day to you all!
  84. Cool, please try it. I'm totally on your side as far as this project is getting better for mankind. -Daisuke from Tokyo
  85. I think it's good to use the new CC4. We should do that.
    • Fair enough if you approve of CC BY-SA 4.0, but that's not quite what the proposed new terms would give you. They would also impose this unnecessary and objectionable clause: "Where you own Sui Generis Database Rights covered by CC BY-SA 4.0, you waive these rights. As an example, this means facts you contribute to the projects may be reused freely without attribution." That clause overrides important attribution provisions present in CC BY-SA 4.0, and would in effect create a confusing crayon license. Far from a straight license upgrade! Zazpot (talk) 01:31, 8 November 2016 (UTC)Reply
  86. Yes. this would be free of use.
  87. Yes. Now, let's move on. --Elitre (talk) 15:02, 6 October 2016 (UTC)Reply
  88. Admittedly, I have minimal comprehension of the language set forth to describe the proposed change. But from what I gather it is merely an upgrade from currently used practices and procedures, generally improving accessibility for international audiences and simplifying annotation by regular users. It sounds good to me. I support the proposed upgrade. - Gale B Hagerty--Galehagerty (talk) 16:15, 6 October 2016 (UTC)Reply
    • Fair enough if you approve of CC BY-SA 4.0, but that's not quite what the proposed new terms would give you. They would also impose this unnecessary and objectionable clause: "Where you own Sui Generis Database Rights covered by CC BY-SA 4.0, you waive these rights. As an example, this means facts you contribute to the projects may be reused freely without attribution." That clause overrides important attribution provisions present in CC BY-SA 4.0, and would in effect create a confusing crayon license. Far from a straight license upgrade! Zazpot (talk) 01:31, 8 November 2016 (UTC)Reply
  89. I think it's great policy to be changed time to time according to the world's progress 2405:204:A401:43F7:0:0:196E:50B0 16:17, 6 October 2016 (UTC)Reply
  90. I've got no problem with the proposed change. Seems reasonable, so I support it. Ks0stm (TCG) 15:53, 6 October 2016 (UTC)Reply
  91. I support it because of the international clarification.If a user who's language is not available in the licence does something that violates it,he/she would blame the licence for not having international clarification.So licence 4.0 would prevent this happening.
  92.   SupportChristopher.ursich (talk) 16:04, 6 October 2016 (UTC)Reply
  93. Estoy de acuerdo con la Creative Commons 4.0. --Micnous (talk) 16:26, 6 October 2016 (UTC)Reply
  94. I think it's a very good idea. Go for it! SapphireWilliams (talk pagecontributions) 13:41, 6 October 2016 (UTC)Reply
  95. Any Wikipedia ill improve clarity and international accessibility sounds like a good thing to do.
  96. I support the upgrade. In particular the translation to non-English languages is an important improvement.
  97. I support the upgrade.
  98. I welcome the upgrade to CC BY-SA 4.0. A top-notch BY-SA license will help Wikimedia better support its mission of creating and disseminating libre knowledge. --Isacdaavid (talk) 17:26, 6 October 2016 (UTC)Reply
    • Fair enough if you approve of CC BY-SA 4.0, but that's not quite what the proposed new terms would give you. They would also impose this unnecessary and objectionable clause: "Where you own Sui Generis Database Rights covered by CC BY-SA 4.0, you waive these rights. As an example, this means facts you contribute to the projects may be reused freely without attribution." That clause overrides important attribution provisions present in CC BY-SA 4.0, and would in effect create a confusing crayon license. Far from a straight license upgrade! Zazpot (talk) 01:31, 8 November 2016 (UTC)Reply
  99. Strongly support adopting the updated Creative Commons 4.0. I think the move to Creative Commons 3.0 was one of the best decisions of the Wiki community, and it should be updated. Forpeterssake (talk) 17:24, 6 October 2016 (UTC)Reply
    • Fair enough if you approve of CC BY-SA 4.0, but that's not quite what the proposed new terms would give you. They would also impose this unnecessary and objectionable clause: "Where you own Sui Generis Database Rights covered by CC BY-SA 4.0, you waive these rights. As an example, this means facts you contribute to the projects may be reused freely without attribution." That clause overrides important attribution provisions present in CC BY-SA 4.0, and would in effect create a confusing crayon license. Far from a straight license upgrade! Zazpot (talk) 01:31, 8 November 2016 (UTC)Reply
  100. I support the change. --Bezanson (talk) 17:55, 6 October 2016 (UTC)Reply
  101. Support Before people blindly support or oppose, I think they should see the actual changes (which can be seen here). So, stop hearing or reading theories and vote what you think. --QEDK (talk) 18:27, 6 October 2016 (UTC)Reply
  102. Support Oefe (talk) 18:47, 6 October 2016 (UTC)Reply
  103. +1 Mitar (talk) 19:00, 6 October 2016 (UTC)Reply
  104.   Support Wikimedia projects need a modern copyright standard, and they've proven that Creative Commons is viable for everyone to use worldwide. Attribution-ShareAlike 4.0 International has demonstrated its own stability 3 years after its release, though when we pushed for 3.0 there was only a 2 year span. I feel that giving the new version this much time to work itself out has really done well for the global community, as Porting finally becomes International. I can't wait to edit with this new version. Good luck, team. FosterHaven (talk) 19:38, 6 October 2016 (UTC)Reply
    • Fair enough if you approve of CC BY-SA 4.0, but that's not quite what the proposed new terms would give you. They would also impose this unnecessary and objectionable clause: "Where you own Sui Generis Database Rights covered by CC BY-SA 4.0, you waive these rights. As an example, this means facts you contribute to the projects may be reused freely without attribution." That clause overrides important attribution provisions present in CC BY-SA 4.0, and would in effect create a confusing crayon license. Far from a straight license upgrade! Zazpot (talk) 01:31, 8 November 2016 (UTC)Reply
  105.   Support Of course! The CC 4.0 licenses are issued in 2013. Why did we wait so long?--Ctac (talk) 20:25, 6 October 2016 (UTC)Reply
    • Fair enough if you approve of CC BY-SA 4.0, but that's not quite what the proposed new terms would give you. They would also impose this unnecessary and objectionable clause: "Where you own Sui Generis Database Rights covered by CC BY-SA 4.0, you waive these rights. As an example, this means facts you contribute to the projects may be reused freely without attribution." That clause overrides important attribution provisions present in CC BY-SA 4.0, and would in effect create a confusing crayon license. Far from a straight license upgrade! Zazpot (talk) 01:31, 8 November 2016 (UTC)Reply
  106. You have my support for this change, it is a good change to all of wikipedia
  107. support
  108.   Support Sounds like a good step forward, it's better to use the latest license version than the older one. Thanks. Mike Peel (talk) 20:30, 6 October 2016 (UTC)Reply
    • Fair enough if you approve of CC BY-SA 4.0, but that's not quite what the proposed new terms would give you. They would also impose this unnecessary and objectionable clause: "Where you own Sui Generis Database Rights covered by CC BY-SA 4.0, you waive these rights. As an example, this means facts you contribute to the projects may be reused freely without attribution." That clause overrides important attribution provisions present in CC BY-SA 4.0, and would in effect create a confusing crayon license. Far from a straight license upgrade! Zazpot (talk) 01:31, 8 November 2016 (UTC)Reply
  109.   Support Hi I agree that u should upgrade btw halp I need help!!!!!!!!!
  110. As long as the proposed change represents progress in openness and not suppressing similar efforts — The preceding unsigned comment was added by 216.9.12.37 (talk)
  111. Support --BarrierBuilder (talk) 21:58, 6 October 2016 (UTC)Reply
  112.   Support About time :) Thanks for explaining the diff for people new to the idea. SJ talk  22:43, 6 October 2016 (UTC)Reply
  113. I fully support this, and it is nice that it will be translated for other users.
  114. Agree David S. Hwang (talk) 00:31, 7 October 2016 (UTC)Reply
  115. Support. For the ones asking what the point is of switching, it is because the 4.0 license specifies that re-use must be under 4.0 or later. While we publish under 3.0, this prevents us from re-using 4.0 content that is licensed out in the world, so we're preventing an ever-increasing amount of content from being used here. Crow (talk) 00:39, 7 October 2016 (UTC)Reply
    • Fair enough if you approve of CC BY-SA 4.0, but that's not quite what the proposed new terms would give you. They would also impose this unnecessary and objectionable clause: "Where you own Sui Generis Database Rights covered by CC BY-SA 4.0, you waive these rights. As an example, this means facts you contribute to the projects may be reused freely without attribution." That clause overrides important attribution provisions present in CC BY-SA 4.0, and would in effect create a confusing crayon license. Far from a straight license upgrade! Zazpot (talk) 01:31, 8 November 2016 (UTC)Reply
  116.   Support --QuasarTE (talk) 01:05, 7 October 2016 (UTC)Reply
  117. As a coauthor of this license, I have been looking forward to this for a long time. ;-) Kat Walsh (spill your mind?) 01:10, 7 October 2016 (UTC)Reply
    • Fair enough if you approve of CC BY-SA 4.0, but that's not quite what the proposed new terms would give you. They would also impose this unnecessary and objectionable clause: "Where you own Sui Generis Database Rights covered by CC BY-SA 4.0, you waive these rights. As an example, this means facts you contribute to the projects may be reused freely without attribution." That clause overrides important attribution provisions present in CC BY-SA 4.0, and would in effect create a confusing crayon license. Far from a straight license upgrade! Zazpot (talk) 01:31, 8 November 2016 (UTC)Reply
  118. This seems like a no-brainer to me. Certainly update to the newest cc license. I'm not even sure it warrants this much discussion.
    • Fair enough if you approve of CC BY-SA 4.0, but that's not quite what the proposed new terms would give you. They would also impose this unnecessary and objectionable clause: "Where you own Sui Generis Database Rights covered by CC BY-SA 4.0, you waive these rights. As an example, this means facts you contribute to the projects may be reused freely without attribution." That clause overrides important attribution provisions present in CC BY-SA 4.0, and would in effect create a confusing crayon license. Far from a straight license upgrade! Zazpot (talk) 01:31, 8 November 2016 (UTC)Reply
  119. This changes are very important to make a good work. —The preceding unsigned comment was added by FernandoObregón2301 (talk) 03:39, 7 October 2016
  120.  Klaas `Z4␟` V: : jawohl, yes, surely, oui, bien, sí, certo, jazeker 04:53, 7 October 2016 (UTC)Reply
  121. absolutely! information should always be free and accessible to everyone! freely available information leads to critical thinking rather than just believing everything you're told. getting more people to think for themselves is the only way we'll ever be able to bring everyone together.
  122. please mention wikipedia info is not 100% correct
  123.   Strong support let's move forwards. Also, Wikipedia is well known as a Abmahnfalle in Germany right now. You cannot rally translate this: for example, people upload pictures and search for use that doesn't fulfill all the requirements. Those people then send mails via lawyers and demand - legally! - large amounts of money. CC 4.0 seems to help against this business model. --Sargoth (talk) 08:34, 7 October 2016 (UTC)Reply
  124.   Support - reasons: I (we, or many of us) use 4.0 almost everywhere, including commons; the language is simpler; international adaptation is much better; sui generis is important to cover; possible further restricting moral rights is important to cover. --grin 08:58, 7 October 2016 (UTC)Reply
  125. Sounds good to me. Deryck C. 10:32, 7 October 2016 (UTC)Reply
  126.   Support內容清楚,強調條目的所有權是維基媒體基金會的。--香港中立人 (talk) 11:58, 7 October 2016 (UTC)Reply
  127.   Support --Thibaut120094 (talk) 13:11, 7 October 2016 (UTC)Reply
  128.   Strong support Why not? It doesn't affect me and other contributors too much. LCtalk 13:33, 7 October 2016 (UTC)Reply
  129.   Support Support upgrading license per readability. I'm also going to address some of the Oppose votes in this comment.
    "It seems to give another non-profit power and control over wikipedia, in the long run."-We are not giving Creative Commons control over Wikipedia. We are using one of their template licences. Besides, we've been using the CC license for years, and we aren't controlled by Creative Commons.
    "IDK if Wikipedia should do this."-If you're not sure about your position, you should be in Neutral, not Oppose.
    "The juvenile delinquents who sold us computers and software always ask for an "upgrade" that diminishes application functionality and restricts and eliminates rights first purchased by the user, they have now turned their smartphones and computers to the task of advertisement platform to sell the unneeded and unwanted. Please WIKI don't go down that evil path. Extraneous Note: By the way, same thing happens with learning curves, up the hill,, up the hill again, and again, and again until the last becomes insurmountable so that the functionality of the hardware and software is not only degraded it becomes totally dysfunctional. You could chart the economic outcome along the glut of plder, less gymnastic, elders are there."-This is totally a non sequitur. Software upgrades are totally unrelated to updating Wikipedia's licence.Joshualouie711 (talk) 13:39, 7 October 2016 (UTC)Reply
  130.   Strong support DiptanshuTalk 14:01, 7 October 2016 (UTC)Reply
  131. I fully support this.
  132. I think this is a great thing for Wikipedia to do. I fully support it.
  133.   Strong support --Galessandroni (talk) 16:16, 7 October 2016 (UTC)Reply
  134. I support. --Goran tek-en (talk) 17:00, 7 October 2016 (UTC)Reply
  135. I strongly support this. This would be a great idea for wikimedia.   Strong support EatePurple (talk) 17:36, 7 October 2016 (UTC)Reply
  136.   Strong support -- Ulilux
  137. I support at 100%, and think it would be a great improvement. [Maël Shanti]
  138.   Support Technology changes, the way we use it changes, the licenses should change as well. Also: "New is always better. B. Stinson". --Joseph (talk) 18:42, 7 October 2016 (UTC)Reply
  139.   Support Clearer and more usable is better!
  140.   Strong support -- Tensor
  141.   Support --TerraCodes (talk) 21:32, 7 October 2016 (UTC)Reply
  142.   Strong support Makes complete sense —Galaktos (talk) 22:47, 7 October 2016 (UTC)Reply
  143.   Support An obvious choice -FASTILY 00:51, 8 October 2016 (UTC)Reply
  144.   Support upgrading for clarity. Doesn't change the core issues. --Theredproject (talk) 02:27, 8 October 2016 (UTC)Reply
  145.   Support absolutely
  146. Strongly   Support.--Shwangtianyuan (talk) 06:11, 8 October 2016 (UTC)Reply
  147.   Support Don't see any downside. -- ChamithN (talk) 06:15, 8 October 2016 (UTC)Reply
    • Fair enough if you approve of CC BY-SA 4.0, but that's not quite what the proposed new terms would give you. They would also impose this unnecessary and objectionable clause: "Where you own Sui Generis Database Rights covered by CC BY-SA 4.0, you waive these rights. As an example, this means facts you contribute to the projects may be reused freely without attribution." That clause overrides important attribution provisions present in CC BY-SA 4.0, and would in effect create a confusing crayon license. Far from a straight license upgrade! Zazpot (talk) 01:31, 8 November 2016 (UTC)Reply
  148.   Support It's the sensible thing to do. Simon Peter Hughes (talk) 07:58, 8 October 2016 (UTC)Reply
  149. I agree with the upgrade. Ndan4life (talk) 08:18, 8 October 2016 (UTC)Reply
    • Fair enough if you approve of CC BY-SA 4.0, but that's not quite what the proposed new terms would give you. They would also impose this unnecessary and objectionable clause: "Where you own Sui Generis Database Rights covered by CC BY-SA 4.0, you waive these rights. As an example, this means facts you contribute to the projects may be reused freely without attribution." That clause overrides important attribution provisions present in CC BY-SA 4.0, and would in effect create a confusing crayon license. Far from a straight license upgrade! Zazpot (talk) 01:31, 8 November 2016 (UTC)Reply
  150.   Support These terms are fair and indeed will increase the possibility to translate the license in other languages than english
  151.   Support If all the pages/articles be translated in other languages (automatically?) if this is how I interpreted it, then this will be a great upliftment
  152.   Strong support Localising the license would help with Wikipedia's localisation, considering that Wikipedia is offered in many languages. Vicr123 (talk) :)
    • Fair enough if you approve of CC BY-SA 4.0, but that's not quite what the proposed new terms would give you. They would also impose this unnecessary and objectionable clause: "Where you own Sui Generis Database Rights covered by CC BY-SA 4.0, you waive these rights. As an example, this means facts you contribute to the projects may be reused freely without attribution." That clause overrides important attribution provisions present in CC BY-SA 4.0, and would in effect create a confusing crayon license. Far from a straight license upgrade! Zazpot (talk) 01:31, 8 November 2016 (UTC)Reply
  153.   Support ~Cybularny Speak? 13:42, 8 October 2016 (UTC)Reply
  154.   За--Vasyan Nyasha (talk) 14:50, 8 October 2016 (UTC)Reply
  155.   Strong support - Totally agree
  156.   Strong support - I agree
  157.   Strong support - Don't see any downsides in keeping up with the newest version of the CC license. --gzost
    • Fair enough if you approve of CC BY-SA 4.0, but that's not quite what the proposed new terms would give you. They would also impose this unnecessary and objectionable clause: "Where you own Sui Generis Database Rights covered by CC BY-SA 4.0, you waive these rights. As an example, this means facts you contribute to the projects may be reused freely without attribution." That clause overrides important attribution provisions present in CC BY-SA 4.0, and would in effect create a confusing crayon license. Far from a straight license upgrade! Zazpot (talk) 01:31, 8 November 2016 (UTC)Reply
  158.   Strong support - Considering the newer license is not only more up to date but also more understandable, there really shouldn't be any opposition to this at all. Keeping the creative commons library up to date and running is one of the best ways to promote the public domain and keep the sharing of ideas alive and well. --Agentfly42
  159. Hello. At personally i think this update is pretty good. — The preceding unsigned comment was added by 188.238.200.20 (talk)
  160. yes i do believe that this update is necessary as it will avoid propaganda of wrong information which will improve efficiency and clarity of wikipedia
    • Fair enough if you approve of CC BY-SA 4.0, but that's not quite what the proposed new terms would give you. They would also impose this unnecessary and objectionable clause: "Where you own Sui Generis Database Rights covered by CC BY-SA 4.0, you waive these rights. As an example, this means facts you contribute to the projects may be reused freely without attribution." That clause overrides important attribution provisions present in CC BY-SA 4.0, and would in effect create a confusing crayon license. Far from a straight license upgrade! Zazpot (talk) 01:31, 8 November 2016 (UTC)Reply
  161. I also support changing the license to version 4.0 -- Stephan Kulla (talk) 19:15, 8 October 2016 (UTC)Reply
    • Fair enough if you approve of CC BY-SA 4.0, but that's not quite what the proposed new terms would give you. They would also impose this unnecessary and objectionable clause: "Where you own Sui Generis Database Rights covered by CC BY-SA 4.0, you waive these rights. As an example, this means facts you contribute to the projects may be reused freely without attribution." That clause overrides important attribution provisions present in CC BY-SA 4.0, and would in effect create a confusing crayon license. Far from a straight license upgrade! Zazpot (talk) 01:31, 8 November 2016 (UTC)Reply
  162.   Support Michael Barera (talk) 21:16, 8 October 2016 (UTC)Reply
  163.   Support Why not? 211.30.223.204 22:17, 8 October 2016 (UTC)Reply
  164.   Strong support This upgrade makes sense since CC 4.0 improves and clarifies terms of the license and increases access to a wider global audience. --˘ | ˘ Hwajaetalkcontribs 01:15, 9 October 2016 (UTC)Reply
    • Fair enough if you approve of CC BY-SA 4.0, but that's not quite what the proposed new terms would give you. They would also impose this unnecessary and objectionable clause: "Where you own Sui Generis Database Rights covered by CC BY-SA 4.0, you waive these rights. As an example, this means facts you contribute to the projects may be reused freely without attribution." That clause overrides important attribution provisions present in CC BY-SA 4.0, and would in effect create a confusing crayon license. Far from a straight license upgrade! Zazpot (talk) 01:31, 8 November 2016 (UTC)Reply
  165.   Support Sounds good. 68.82.219.24 05:12, 9 October 2016 (UTC)Reply
  166.   Support More flexible attribution requirements and opportunity to correct minor license violation in 30 days is more suitable to web environment than before. – Kwj2772 (msg) 05:58, 9 October 2016 (UTC)Reply
    • Fair enough if you approve of CC BY-SA 4.0, but that's not quite what the proposed new terms would give you. They would also impose this unnecessary and objectionable clause: "Where you own Sui Generis Database Rights covered by CC BY-SA 4.0, you waive these rights. As an example, this means facts you contribute to the projects may be reused freely without attribution." That clause overrides important attribution provisions present in CC BY-SA 4.0, and would in effect create a confusing crayon license. Far from a straight license upgrade! Zazpot (talk) 01:31, 8 November 2016 (UTC)Reply
  167. I TOTALLY AGREE
  168.   Support. Фред-Продавец звёзд (talk) 10:48, 9 October 2016 (UTC)Reply
  169.   Support While certainly specific topics could be debated (and I hope the comments on the pages here will be followed up by Wikimedia), the overall picture I get i very positive. To me, the choices proposed seem reasonable. We will always need to trade off personal rights vs. usability of the content. E.g. the waiver regarding database rights seems important to me as it enables to much more easily create follow-up works. Please note that it's not only about legal rights and duties but also about practicability (e.g. while getting consent in every case seems author-friendly, it would not work practically and such things could break the whole collaboration model). The balance chosen here seems good to me. To opposers, please note that the formal setup differs a lot in each and every country especially between "copyright" jurisdictions and "authors' rights'" jurisdictions - the proposal needs to work for both of these systems and may therefore contain topics that could be deemed superfluous or misleading in one country or another (while still being crucial for the system to work world-wide). Buan~dewiki (talk) 11:40, 9 October 2016 (UTC)Reply
  170.   Support Xbony2 (talk) 12:23, 9 October 2016 (UTC)Reply
  171.   Support ChristianKl (talk) 13:48, 9 October 2016 (UTC)Reply
  172.   Support -Paul1337 (talk) 14:07, 9 October 2016 (UTC)Reply
  173.   Support I had a few concerns about compatibility, but they seem to have been addressed adwquately. - AfroThundr3007730 (talk) 17:58, 9 October 2016 (UTC)Reply
  174.   Support -- Herbert Ortner (talk) 18:43, 9 October 2016 (UTC)Reply
  175.   Support: none of the oppose rationales sway me. — Bilorv (talk) 19:08, 9 October 2016 (UTC)Reply
  176.   Support --Artoria2e5 (talk) 20:52, 9 October 2016 (UTC)Reply
  177.   Support --«izoozo» talk 21:25, 9 October 2016 (UTC)Reply
  178. I   Support This would be great for educational purposes!
  179. I   Support --Aldotron (ディスカッション) 01:00, 10 October 2016 (UTC)
  180.   Support --Higa4 (talk) 03:05, 10 October 2016 (UTC)Reply
  181. I Template:Strongly support this. Ensuring the freedom of this information is always something worth
  182.   Strong support. There's no reason not to (from my understanding). -- TheZcuber (talk) 04:09, 10 October 2016 (UTC)Reply
  183.   Support why not Jpgibert (talk) 09:57, 10 October 2016 (UTC)Reply
  184.   Support I see no reason to not support this change. A better international version of the CC-BY-SA license can only be good. I agree with how 4.0 actually handles database rights (where applicable) and am mostly for waiving the personality, privacy and moral rights (again, where applicable). However, the current FAQ and Legal Note DOES NOT conclusively cover what is covered under privacy/personality/moral rights and that should be added for clarity purposes. Ciridae (talk) 12:07, 10 October 2016 (UTC)Reply
  185.   Strong support - Who wouldn't? --Breaksreak (talk) 22:00, 10 October 2016 (UTC)Reply
  186.   Support --B Astutus (talk) 03:39, 11 October 2016 (UTC)Reply
  187.   Strong support I've multi-licensed all my attributions throughout WikiMedia sites since GFDL and CC 2.5. CC 4.0 was a natural progression, and I continue to support it. It will be nice to see this simpler, more standardized version of the Creative Commons license become the standard, just like 3.0 supplanted 2.5 and GFDL so long ago. Willscrlt ( Talk | w:en | com | b:en ) 09:58, 11 October 2016 (UTC)Reply
    • Fair enough if you approve of CC BY-SA 4.0, but that's not quite what the proposed new terms would give you. They would also impose this unnecessary and objectionable clause: "Where you own Sui Generis Database Rights covered by CC BY-SA 4.0, you waive these rights. As an example, this means facts you contribute to the projects may be reused freely without attribution." That clause overrides important attribution provisions present in CC BY-SA 4.0, and would in effect create a confusing crayon license. Far from a straight license upgrade! Zazpot (talk) 01:31, 8 November 2016 (UTC)Reply
  188.   Support --Theredmonkey (talk) 10:04, 11 October 2016 (UTC)Reply
  189.   Support Sounds like a simple 'upgrade', thus I don't see why we should do this. Trijnsteltalk 10:37, 11 October 2016 (UTC)Reply
    • Fair enough if you approve of CC BY-SA 4.0, but that's not quite what the proposed new terms would give you. They would also impose this unnecessary and objectionable clause: "Where you own Sui Generis Database Rights covered by CC BY-SA 4.0, you waive these rights. As an example, this means facts you contribute to the projects may be reused freely without attribution." That clause overrides important attribution provisions present in CC BY-SA 4.0, and would in effect create a confusing crayon license. Far from a straight license upgrade! Zazpot (talk) 01:31, 8 November 2016 (UTC)Reply
  190.   Support upgrading to CC-BY-SA 4.0 Atsme📞📧 21:15, 11 October 2016 (UTC)Reply
    • Fair enough if you approve of CC BY-SA 4.0, but that's not quite what the proposed new terms would give you. They would also impose this unnecessary and objectionable clause: "Where you own Sui Generis Database Rights covered by CC BY-SA 4.0, you waive these rights. As an example, this means facts you contribute to the projects may be reused freely without attribution." That clause overrides important attribution provisions present in CC BY-SA 4.0, and would in effect create a confusing crayon license. Far from a straight license upgrade! Zazpot (talk) 01:31, 8 November 2016 (UTC)Reply
  191.   Strong support Yes for the CC-BY-SA 4.0 -- issimo 15 !? 07:56, 12 October 2016 (UTC)Reply
  192.   Strong support. I'm not an expert on Creative Commons, but based on what I do know (and this blog post: https://creativecommons.org/share-your-work/licensing-considerations/version4/), the 4.0 version is better for organizations with an international scope. -- Ogie1002 09:21, 12 October 2016 (UTC)Reply
  193.   Support - Seems a good idea! --YodinT 10:30, 12 October 2016 (UTC)Reply
  194.   Support -- The changes will not affect most users, but will simplify the actual license text, making interpretation of it more consistent. A review of oppose ivotes suggests that many of those opposing don't understand the entirety of the changes, and are either expressing dissatisfaction with licensing terms in general, a lack of knowledge about current licensing requirements, or frustration at changing what does not appear (to them, anyway) to be broken (fear of change, perhaps). I am also concerned about the high number of unsigned comments (both for and against), and this leads to the conclusion that many of those who are commenting are unfamiliar with the way the various Wikipedia projects are supposed to work in general. For those who just want to read Wikipedia, this change will not affect how you use Wikipedia. Likewise, those who simply want to edit articles and share their knowledge with the world will be mostly unaffected by this change as well. Finally, content that is already part of the affected projects will remain intact. New changes including new pages will have revised licensing terms. Those who reuse content elsewhere will need to read, understand, and comply with the new terms, but this is not an onerous task for those who are reusing the work of others, especially those who are profiting from same. Etamni | ✉  11:11, 12 October 2016 (UTC)Reply
  195.   Support -- I strongly dislike legal stuff because I have a hard time understanding it (senseless) having the opportunity to correct license violations is great, specially in cases where we do not provide sufficient attribution at first, but are willing to correct the mistake once notified. vicsar
  196.   Support - I trust the legal team at Wikimedia, and am glad to follow their recommendation. The changes, as described in their summary, look sensible and minor. --denny (talk) 17:08, 12 October 2016 (UTC)Reply
  197.   Strong support - The legal team seems to have strong, and well-reasoned, answers for the various objections raised, and this simply makes sense. Revent (talk) 17:18, 12 October 2016 (UTC)Reply
  198.   Support - Sounds reasonable. Dodoïste (talk) 17:27, 12 October 2016 (UTC)Reply
  199.   Support - It's about time we moved on to 4.0 Ronhjones (talk) 18:25, 12 October 2016 (UTC)Reply
    • Fair enough if you approve of CC BY-SA 4.0, but that's not quite what the proposed new terms would give you. They would also impose this unnecessary and objectionable clause: "Where you own Sui Generis Database Rights covered by CC BY-SA 4.0, you waive these rights. As an example, this means facts you contribute to the projects may be reused freely without attribution." That clause overrides important attribution provisions present in CC BY-SA 4.0, and would in effect create a confusing crayon license. Far from a straight license upgrade! Zazpot (talk) 01:31, 8 November 2016 (UTC)Reply
  200.   Support - Its ok, but I think they need to be more clear about it --Santosha86 (talk) 19:32, 12 October 2016 (UTC)Reply
  201.   Support -- totally in keeping with what the spirit of what Wikipedia is.--KTo288 (talk) 19:55, 12 October 2016 (UTC)Reply
  202. The 4.0 version seems like the most logical step/progression for the Wikimedia information presentation. Up-to-date information and added clarity will be greatly appreciated! — The preceding unsigned comment was added by GW BUDDY (talk)
    • Fair enough if you approve of CC BY-SA 4.0, but that's not quite what the proposed new terms would give you. They would also impose this unnecessary and objectionable clause: "Where you own Sui Generis Database Rights covered by CC BY-SA 4.0, you waive these rights. As an example, this means facts you contribute to the projects may be reused freely without attribution." That clause overrides important attribution provisions present in CC BY-SA 4.0, and would in effect create a confusing crayon license. Far from a straight license upgrade! Zazpot (talk) 01:31, 8 November 2016 (UTC)Reply
  203. right, it's good for change. i'm ok 113.171.185.13 14:02, 10 October 2016 (UTC)Reply
  204. I am in support with the proposed amendments.. thank you 122.170.190.237 08:02, 12 October 2016 (UTC)Reply
  205. I would like to see this implementation due to the upgraded requirements. I have always loved WikiMedia products, and I want to have their content free to use with more requirements so that everyone can easily get access to it. — The preceding unsigned comment was added by 71.89.135.6 (talk)
  206. The more modern the better — The preceding unsigned comment was added by 81.145.160.10 (talk)
  207.   Support An international license for an international project. Simplifies copying of facts from Wikipedia to other databases. – Gorlingor (talk) 23:03, 12 October 2016 (UTC)Reply
  208.   Support it would be great -- Bonafide2004 (talk) 02:20, 13 October 2016 (UTC)Reply
  209.   Support: A reasonable adjustment in an area of continuing volatility (EU etc). AllyD (talk) 10:08, 13 October 2016 (UTC)Reply
  210.   Support Definitely a better licence for wiki text. And I've been using it for my images for a while. -- Colin (talk) 10:17, 13 October 2016 (UTC)Reply
    • Fair enough if you approve of CC BY-SA 4.0, but that's not quite what the proposed new terms would give you. They would also impose this unnecessary and objectionable clause: "Where you own Sui Generis Database Rights covered by CC BY-SA 4.0, you waive these rights. As an example, this means facts you contribute to the projects may be reused freely without attribution." That clause overrides important attribution provisions present in CC BY-SA 4.0, and would in effect create a confusing crayon license. Far from a straight license upgrade! Zazpot (talk) 01:31, 8 November 2016 (UTC)Reply
  211.   Support It's OK Darkshiren 15:51, 13 October 2016 (UTC)Reply
  212.   Support I completely agree with this, 4.0 and Share-Alike will only benefit us.
  213.   Strong supportDuman Aras (talk) 15:58, 13 October 2016 (UTC)Reply
  214. Yes, Free knowledge, free world ! I support to be under creative commons. — The preceding unsigned comment was added by 123.201.119.12 (talk) 2016-10-13T15:31:28 (UTC)
  215. I don't know why this is even being contested — The preceding unsigned comment was added by 210.55.186.170 (talk) 20:54, 13 October 2016 (UTC)Reply
  216. I live in china,but I can not read chinece words,I hope the size of words can big and clean,sometimes I can chang some word--Juntao wang (talk) 03:29, 14 October 2016 (UTC)Reply
  217.   Support It will be great
  218.   Support 08:50, 14 October 2016 (UTC)
  219.   Strong support Thanks to whomever put the diff together, very helpful! Lirazelf (talk) 09:03, 14 October 2016 (UTC)Reply
  220.   Strong support It's an improvement) for those reasons. Kautuk1 (talk) 12:19, 14 October 2016 (UTC)Reply
    • Fair enough if you approve of CC BY-SA 4.0, but that's not quite what the proposed new terms would give you. They would also impose this unnecessary and objectionable clause: "Where you own Sui Generis Database Rights covered by CC BY-SA 4.0, you waive these rights. As an example, this means facts you contribute to the projects may be reused freely without attribution." That clause overrides important attribution provisions present in CC BY-SA 4.0, and would in effect create a confusing crayon license. Far from a straight license upgrade! Zazpot (talk) 01:31, 8 November 2016 (UTC)Reply
  221.   Support, per many above. And honestly, the nature of many of the oppose comments only strengthen's my support. Resolute (talk) 13:46, 14 October 2016 (UTC)Reply
  222.   Support It's important to keep the Wikipedia license up-to-date and compatible with the most recent free (libre) content JavierCantero (talk) 15:43, 14 October 2016 (UTC)Reply
  223.   Support, maybe this could improve EU-Database + GPLv3 issues; IANAL. 2A03:2267:0:0:B084:6C34:302E:64D2 20:30, 14 October 2016 (UTC) Please strike this if Be..anyone shows up, on my say-so this won't happen.Reply
  224.   SupportS Marshall (talk) 21:42, 14 October 2016 (UTC)Reply
  225. Change it. It's by keeping up with time that we can progress further and make wikipedia better. — The preceding unsigned comment was added by 112.118.110.131 (talk) 11:18, 14 October 2016 (UTC)Reply
  226.   Support Lin Zhinan (talk) 01:05, 15 October 2016 (UTC)Reply
  227. I agree
  228.   Support It brings more clarity to the license and also includes internationalization. Gtaf (talk) 09:50, 15 October 2016 (UTC)Reply
    • Fair enough if you approve of CC BY-SA 4.0, but that's not quite what the proposed new terms would give you. They would also impose this unnecessary and objectionable clause: "Where you own Sui Generis Database Rights covered by CC BY-SA 4.0, you waive these rights. As an example, this means facts you contribute to the projects may be reused freely without attribution." That clause overrides important attribution provisions present in CC BY-SA 4.0, and would in effect create a confusing crayon license. Far from a straight license upgrade! Zazpot (talk) 01:31, 8 November 2016 (UTC)Reply
  229.   Support Berthgmn (talk) 10:32, 15 October 2016 (UTC)Reply
  230.   Strong support for two main reasons: first, common sense attribution. a long standing problem especially in germany are cease and desist orders for a failure of attribution. second, porting to countries juristdications was ill, no other license needs this and there was no reason CC would need it. --ThurnerRupert (talk) 13:17, 15 October 2016 (UTC)Reply
    • Fair enough if you approve of CC BY-SA 4.0, but that's not quite what the proposed new terms would give you. They would also impose this unnecessary and objectionable clause: "Where you own Sui Generis Database Rights covered by CC BY-SA 4.0, you waive these rights. As an example, this means facts you contribute to the projects may be reused freely without attribution." That clause overrides important attribution provisions present in CC BY-SA 4.0, and would in effect create a confusing crayon license. Far from a straight license upgrade! Zazpot (talk) 01:31, 8 November 2016 (UTC)Reply
  231. I think it's a great idea to update the licence — The preceding unsigned comment was added by Qwertyuioplol (talk) 15:40, 15 October 2016 (UTC)Reply
  232.   Support Tango Mike Bravo (talk) 16:57, 15 October 2016 (UTC)Reply
  233.   Support Francvs (talk) "One monkey don't stop no show." How would Wikipedia be better off if much of the world moved to the new license, and Wikipedia stayed behind?
    • Fair enough if you approve of CC BY-SA 4.0, but that's not quite what the proposed new terms would give you. They would also impose this unnecessary and objectionable clause: "Where you own Sui Generis Database Rights covered by CC BY-SA 4.0, you waive these rights. As an example, this means facts you contribute to the projects may be reused freely without attribution." That clause overrides important attribution provisions present in CC BY-SA 4.0, and would in effect create a confusing crayon license. Far from a straight license upgrade! Zazpot (talk) 01:31, 8 November 2016 (UTC)Reply
  234.   Support -- the wub "?!" 18:44, 15 October 2016 (UTC)Reply
  235. i strongly agree with your new 4.0 code i strongly agree with your new 4.0 version of operation and legal methodology — The preceding unsigned comment was added by Staff612024c99je (talk) 19:37, 15 October 2016 (UTC)Reply
  236.   Support --Kcdills (talk) 11:26, 16 October 2016 (UTC)Reply
  237. Support.. — The preceding unsigned comment was added by 205.214.190.129 (talk) 14:41, 16 October 2016 (UTC)Reply
  238.   Support --Nnnn20430 (talk) 14:56, 16 October 2016 (UTC)Reply
  239.   Support I have read about the differences, and I think that they only help us to further our goals of sharing free knowledge. —TheDJ (talkcontribs) 15:01, 16 October 2016 (UTC)Reply
  240.   Strong support An international license for an international project. I agree. Good step forward! --Lapp (talk) 15:08, 16 October 2016 (UTC)Reply
    • Fair enough if you approve of CC BY-SA 4.0, but that's not quite what the proposed new terms would give you. They would also impose this unnecessary and objectionable clause: "Where you own Sui Generis Database Rights covered by CC BY-SA 4.0, you waive these rights. As an example, this means facts you contribute to the projects may be reused freely without attribution." That clause overrides important attribution provisions present in CC BY-SA 4.0, and would in effect create a confusing crayon license. Far from a straight license upgrade! Zazpot (talk) 01:31, 8 November 2016 (UTC)Reply
  241.   Support let's keep up to date. Royalbroil 16:20, 16 October 2016 (UTC)Reply
    • Fair enough if you approve of CC BY-SA 4.0, but that's not quite what the proposed new terms would give you. They would also impose this unnecessary and objectionable clause: "Where you own Sui Generis Database Rights covered by CC BY-SA 4.0, you waive these rights. As an example, this means facts you contribute to the projects may be reused freely without attribution." That clause overrides important attribution provisions present in CC BY-SA 4.0, and would in effect create a confusing crayon license. Far from a straight license upgrade! Zazpot (talk) 01:31, 8 November 2016 (UTC)Reply
  242.   Support Sounds like a good idea to me.
  243.   Strong support--Mario-WL (talk) 21:24, 16 October 2016 (UTC)Reply
  244.   Strong support. MB298 (talk) 21:39, 16 October 2016 (UTC)Reply
  245.   Support Haxwell (talk) 02:35, 17 October 2016 (UTC)Reply
  246.   Support Peter Pen (talk) 05:59, 17 October 2016 (UTC)Reply
  247.   Support Elfi (talk) 08:07, 17 October 2016 (UTC)Reply
  248.   Support I think CC 4 would help us further the Wikipedia cause. --208.87.239.180 17:16, 17 October 2016 (UTC)Reply
    • Fair enough if you approve of CC BY-SA 4.0, but that's not quite what the proposed new terms would give you. They would also impose this unnecessary and objectionable clause: "Where you own Sui Generis Database Rights covered by CC BY-SA 4.0, you waive these rights. As an example, this means facts you contribute to the projects may be reused freely without attribution." That clause overrides important attribution provisions present in CC BY-SA 4.0, and would in effect create a confusing crayon license. Far from a straight license upgrade! Zazpot (talk) 01:31, 8 November 2016 (UTC)Reply
  249. I totally agree to upgrade. We should accept new changes wholeheartedly and openness. This will bring more clarity. I think there is no such issue to oppose it. — The preceding unsigned comment was added by Mjforbes (talk) 04:39, 17 October 2016 (UTC)Reply
    • Fair enough if you approve of CC BY-SA 4.0, but that's not quite what the proposed new terms would give you. They would also impose this unnecessary and objectionable clause: "Where you own Sui Generis Database Rights covered by CC BY-SA 4.0, you waive these rights. As an example, this means facts you contribute to the projects may be reused freely without attribution." That clause overrides important attribution provisions present in CC BY-SA 4.0, and would in effect create a confusing crayon license. Far from a straight license upgrade! Zazpot (talk) 01:31, 8 November 2016 (UTC)Reply
  250. good idea 109.155.82.243 17:49, 17 October 2016 (UTC)Reply
  251.   Support Walley (talk) 06:15, 18 October 2016 (UTC)Reply
  252.   Support Freedom matters Danialbehzadi (talk) 06:36, 18 October 2016 (UTC)Reply
  253.   Support CC is a well acclaimed licensing tools, Wikipedia will benefit from it --Bujatt (talk) 08:18, 18 October 2016 (UTC)Reply
  254.   Support Wiki content is already licensed under the CC BY-SA 3.0. The discussion at hand is not whether to impose attribution requirements or whether to license under the Creative Commons (it already is!) or whether to switch to a different licence (different subject!). The discussion at hand is whether to simply update to the 4.0 version of the current licence. It seems to me to be common sense to keep up to date with the Creative Commons' licensing, and I have not seen any reasons to ignore the revision and remain on the old 3.0 version. RunasSudo (talk) 11:30, 18 October 2016 (UTC)Reply
    • Fair enough if you approve of CC BY-SA 4.0, but that's not quite what the proposed new terms would give you. They would also impose this unnecessary and objectionable clause: "Where you own Sui Generis Database Rights covered by CC BY-SA 4.0, you waive these rights. As an example, this means facts you contribute to the projects may be reused freely without attribution." That clause overrides important attribution provisions present in CC BY-SA 4.0, and would in effect create a confusing crayon license. Far from a straight license upgrade! Zazpot (talk) 01:31, 8 November 2016 (UTC)Reply
  255.   Support I agree 100% with RunasSudo right above. --Hispalois (talk) 13:47, 18 October 2016 (UTC)Reply
  256.   Support I have read the comparison and support the changes. Constant314 (talk) 13:49, 18 October 2016 (UTC)Reply
  257.   Support Vlk (talk) 14:28, 18 October 2016 (UTC)Reply
  258.   Strong support These terms look good.
  259.   Support Good idea love it.
  260.   Support - I agree with this idea, all the wikimedia pages will be up to date with the creative commons licences. Epic Fails (talk) 04:00, 19 October 2016 (UTC)Reply
  261.   Support About time!
  262.   Support per my comments at Talk:Terms of use/Creative Commons 4.0#What;s really the issue here. עוד מישהו Od Mishehu 13:10, 19 October 2016 (UTC)Reply
  263.   Support MichaelMaggs (talk) 15:33, 19 October 2016 (UTC)Reply
  264.   Support I see nothing wrong on it. --PabloCastellano (talk) 19:47, 19 October 2016 (UTC)Reply
  265. I think this is a good idea. — The preceding unsigned comment was added by 2.51.37.168 (talk) 14:58, 19 October 2016 (UTC)Reply
  266.   Support Didn't read all of that but... I support! New terms of use... Yay
  267. I'm with it, anything to make Wikipedia a more reliable source. — The preceding unsigned comment was added by 168.30.161.195 (talk) 00:52, 20 October 2016 (UTC)Reply
  268.   Support Look Good. Upgrading license is better.--Ranjithsiji (talk) 01:58, 20 October 2016 (UTC)Reply
    • Fair enough if you approve of CC BY-SA 4.0, but that's not quite what the proposed new terms would give you. They would also impose this unnecessary and objectionable clause: "Where you own Sui Generis Database Rights covered by CC BY-SA 4.0, you waive these rights. As an example, this means facts you contribute to the projects may be reused freely without attribution." That clause overrides important attribution provisions present in CC BY-SA 4.0, and would in effect create a confusing crayon license. Far from a straight license upgrade! Zazpot (talk) 01:31, 8 November 2016 (UTC)Reply
  269.   Support. Allan Aguilar (talk) 17:21, 20 October 2016 (UTC)Reply
  270.   Support Lots of work to come, but worth it.--Dthomsen8 (talk) 19:06, 20 October 2016 (UTC)Reply
  271.   Support --Tryptofish (talk) 19:13, 20 October 2016 (UTC)Reply
  272.   Support IANAL, but this seems to support openness and sharing of information. Captain panda 03:18, 21 October 2016 (UTC)Reply
  273.   Support. Ayub407 (talk) 10:18, 21 October 2016 (UTC)Reply
  274.   Support Robert.Harker (talk) 16:19, 21 October 2016 (UTC)Reply
  275.   Support I support this change because CC-BY-SA-4.0 slightly improves on CC-BY-SA-3.0 in a number of respects, with one exception: it isn't donor compatible with CC-BY-SA-3.0. For better or worse that exception makes for an extra important reason to upgrade: so that CC-BY-SA-4.0 text can be incorporated into Wikimedia projects. An alternative would be to get CC to declare CC-BY-SA-4.0 donor compatible with CC-BY-SA-3.0 (see CC-BY-SA-4.0->GPL-3.0 compatibility for mechanism). Mike Linksvayer (talk) 00:10, 22 October 2016 (UTC)Reply
    • Fair enough if you approve of CC BY-SA 4.0, but that's not quite what the proposed new terms would give you. They would also impose this unnecessary and objectionable clause: "Where you own Sui Generis Database Rights covered by CC BY-SA 4.0, you waive these rights. As an example, this means facts you contribute to the projects may be reused freely without attribution." That clause overrides important attribution provisions present in CC BY-SA 4.0, and would in effect create a confusing crayon license. Far from a straight license upgrade! Zazpot (talk) 01:31, 8 November 2016 (UTC)Reply
  276.   Strong support Haquino (talk) 02:28, 22 October 2016 (UTC)Reply
  277.   Support – The 4.0 version resolves several long-standing issues with 3.0 (and earlier), at no apparent cost. The opposes below mostly seem confused, making incorrect assumptions like that the ShareAlike portion is being dropped, or that it was not there before and is being added, or that WP having no license at all and just being public domain is an option, etc. People need to actually read proposals before commenting on them.  — SMcCandlish ¢ ≽ʌⱷ҅ʌ≼  14:29, 22 October 2016 (UTC)Reply
    • Fair enough if you approve of CC BY-SA 4.0, but that's not quite what the proposed new terms would give you. They would also impose this unnecessary and objectionable clause: "Where you own Sui Generis Database Rights covered by CC BY-SA 4.0, you waive these rights. As an example, this means facts you contribute to the projects may be reused freely without attribution." That clause overrides important attribution provisions present in CC BY-SA 4.0, and would in effect create a confusing crayon license. Far from a straight license upgrade! Zazpot (talk) 01:31, 8 November 2016 (UTC)Reply
    • I just really think that's the right idea, yeah. I'd certainly support using the new license – at least for now, and we can see what happens, then.
  278.   Support because we have written an article in CC-BY-SA-4.0 and we would like to reuse it to extend the corresponding Wikipedia article (i.e. All recent articles from LinuxFr.org are under CC-BY-SA-4.0 and cannot be used to complete a wiki under CC-BY-SA-3.0). --Oliver H (talk) 07:52, 24 October 2016 (UTC)Reply
    • Fair enough if you approve of CC BY-SA 4.0, but that's not quite what the proposed new terms would give you. They would also impose this unnecessary and objectionable clause: "Where you own Sui Generis Database Rights covered by CC BY-SA 4.0, you waive these rights. As an example, this means facts you contribute to the projects may be reused freely without attribution." That clause overrides important attribution provisions present in CC BY-SA 4.0, and would in effect create a confusing crayon license. Far from a straight license upgrade! Zazpot (talk) 01:31, 8 November 2016 (UTC)Reply
  279. i Reckon it would be great to update wikipedia. it seems as if nothing will change, with the basic editing and all. Im with it. — The preceding unsigned comment was added by TYT Sirius (talk) 09:09, 25 October 2016 (UTC)Reply
  280.   Support Banjo (talk) 11:17, 25 October 2016 (UTC)Reply
  281.   Support Braveheart (talk) 13:41, 25 October 2016 (UTC) Considering how some users abuse the 3.0-license, changing the license to 4.0 is the only viable path IMO.Reply
    • Fair enough if you approve of CC BY-SA 4.0, but that's not quite what the proposed new terms would give you. They would also impose this unnecessary and objectionable clause: "Where you own Sui Generis Database Rights covered by CC BY-SA 4.0, you waive these rights. As an example, this means facts you contribute to the projects may be reused freely without attribution." That clause overrides important attribution provisions present in CC BY-SA 4.0, and would in effect create a confusing crayon license. Far from a straight license upgrade! Zazpot (talk) 01:31, 8 November 2016 (UTC)Reply
  282.   Support In spite of the confusion it has generated in the discussions, I think it will be less confusing in practice. · · · Peter (Southwood) (talk): 16:56, 25 October 2016 (UTC)Reply
  283.   Strong support -- 2001:8A0:7F2E:E601:C8F1:55AC:7633:8DC7 20:23, 25 October 2016 (UTC)Reply
  284.   Support --Benrusholme (talk) 09:54, 26 October 2016 (UTC)Reply
  285.   Support --Hubertl (talk) 19:36, 26 October 2016 (UTC)Reply
  286.   Support I've read through the objections, and I see little merit there. We should keep up to date. Almonaster (talk) 10:41, 27 October 2016 (UTC)Reply
  287.   Support Urhixidur (talk) 11:54, 27 October 2016 (UTC)Reply
  288.   Support Clearer language and other improvements sound good t o me.
  289.   Support Although I rather had seen CC-BY 4 instead of CC-BY-SA 4. MacFreek (talk) 23:11, 28 October 2016 (UTC)Reply
  290.   Strong support I'm surprised that text on Wikimedia sites are not licensed under CC-BY-SA-4.0. If we don't accept this change, we won't import CC-BY-SA-4.0 text from other websites, because CC 3.0 with copyleft is not compatible with CC 4.0 with copyleft. 4.0 is also more international and clearer than 3.0. There is also a feature which is important from CC 4.0 that is not available in CC 3.0. It is giving a reuser 30 days to fix their mistake (commonly not attributing correctly and not stating the license). It is common for reusers of Wikipedia to not attribute through hyperlink, commonly because they don't know how to attribute. If we don't give these reusers a chance to fix their unintended mistake, reusers may think that Wikipedia is so complicated. It makes no sense if we don't migrate to CC-BY-SA-4.0, since CC-BY-SA-3.0 can be relicensed under 4.0 for derivative works. --Pokéfan95 (talk) 10:55, 29 October 2016 (UTC)Reply
    • Fair enough if you approve of CC BY-SA 4.0, but that's not quite what the proposed new terms would give you. They would also impose this unnecessary and objectionable clause: "Where you own Sui Generis Database Rights covered by CC BY-SA 4.0, you waive these rights. As an example, this means facts you contribute to the projects may be reused freely without attribution." That clause overrides important attribution provisions present in CC BY-SA 4.0, and would in effect create a confusing crayon license. Far from a straight license upgrade! Zazpot (talk) 01:31, 8 November 2016 (UTC)Reply
  291.   Support Reasonable upgrade. --GRuban (talk) 21:46, 29 October 2016 (UTC)Reply
  292.   Support. Don't see why not. Fume-la (talk) 09:30, 31 October 2016 (UTC)Reply
  293.   Support --Joi (talk) 17:20, 31 October 2016 (UTC)Reply
  294.   Strong support Makes a lot of the de facto ways it already works, in the US, more explicit and clear. 2601:602:C303:C670:A87D:A958:6379:B134 08:22, 1 November 2016 (UTC)Reply
  295.   Strong support Didn't read all the stuff but looks good in my viewpoint. 09:51, 1 November 2016 (EST)
  296.   Support There seems to be no real downside and this will need doing now and then. -- Idyllic press (talk) 16:20, 1 November 2016 (UTC)Reply
  297.   Support This seems to mostly be a usability and clarification upgrade. The matter of moral rights, from my limited reading on the topic, seems to be a non-issue. While some technical aspects of the rights handled in v3.0 vs. v4.0 are different, those are largely due to increased clarity of (rather than a change to) the intent in v3.0. Tfocker4 (talk) 20:43, 1 November 2016 (UTC)Reply
    • Fair enough if you approve of CC BY-SA 4.0, but that's not quite what the proposed new terms would give you. They would also impose this unnecessary and objectionable clause: "Where you own Sui Generis Database Rights covered by CC BY-SA 4.0, you waive these rights. As an example, this means facts you contribute to the projects may be reused freely without attribution." That clause overrides important attribution provisions present in CC BY-SA 4.0, and would in effect create a confusing crayon license. Far from a straight license upgrade! Zazpot (talk) 01:31, 8 November 2016 (UTC)Reply
  298. It would be cool since people could use it for more and more things. I definately agree on this creative commons thing. — The preceding unsigned comment was added by 86.115.240.34 (talk) 07:55, 1 November 2016 (UTC)Reply
  299.   Support I'm a new user but to me this seems like a good change. thank you KIRTIS (talk) 10:31, 2 November 2016 (UTC)*   Support I'm a new user but to me this seems like a good change. thank you KIRTIS (talk) 10:31, 2 November 2016 (UTC)Reply
  300. Yes. It is long over due — The preceding unsigned comment was added by Olileanyao (talk) 11:22, 2 November 2016 (UTC)Reply
  301. best update to Wikimedia ever
  302. I'm in favour of any change leading to increased openness and ease of use. This proposed change sounds like another step in that direction.Consequently I   Support the CC licence upgrade Redwidgeon (talk) 03:12, 3 November 2016 (UTC)Reply
  303.   Support Got a chance to read only the gist... sounds good as long as it sticks to basic tenets.
  304.   Support I think the v4 licence adds value to an already good usage. I support the use of CC-By-SA particularly because the work is too valuable to be made a commercial commodity even as a derivative. --Crimperman (talk) 13:41, 3 November 2016 (UTC)Reply
  305.   Support In may opinion it is next important step in development of the general Wikipedia idea.
  306.   Support, more simple and opened to those not skilled enough with english language so as to go deep into the license. Comme moi. Cordialement et Hop ! Kikuyu3 (talk) 15:18, 4 November 2016 (UTC)Reply
  307.   Support Crucial that Wikimedia Foundation shows their renewed commitment to CC license principles. Keep it going! Hakuin Ullman (talk) 19:41, 5 November 2016 (UTC)Reply
    • Fair enough if you approve of CC BY-SA 4.0, but that's not quite what the proposed new terms would give you. They would also impose this unnecessary and objectionable clause: "Where you own Sui Generis Database Rights covered by CC BY-SA 4.0, you waive these rights. As an example, this means facts you contribute to the projects may be reused freely without attribution." That clause overrides important attribution provisions present in CC BY-SA 4.0, and would in effect create a confusing crayon license. Far from a straight license upgrade! Zazpot (talk) 14:50, 8 November 2016 (UTC)Reply
  308.   Support - and consolidating (please help) here. --Krauss (talk) 20:32, 5 November 2016 (UTC)Reply
  309.   Support All for it!
  310.   Support Why not? Jc86035 (talk) 13:20, 6 November 2016 (UTC)Reply
  311.   Support good update Dbastro (talk) 20:35, 6 November 2016 (UTC)Reply
  312.   Support good update IMO -- George Chernilevsky (talk) 21:36, 6 November 2016 (UTC)Reply
  313.   Strong support Not only is it a great improvement, CC4.0 essentially supplants CC3.0. It would therefore be folly for Wikimedia not to adopt it and instead deliberately work under an obsolete licensing protocol out of sync with how CC operates going forward Ultracobalt (talk) 01:40, 7 November 2016 (UTC)Reply
  314.   Support -- MichaelSchoenitzer (talk) 16:57, 7 November 2016 (UTC)Reply
  315.   Strong support -- It makes sense that we should always use the latest version going forward, without this process. The discussion has attracted ignorant 'answers', which is damaging. Adroit (talk)
    • Fair enough if you approve of CC BY-SA 4.0, but that's not quite what the proposed new terms would give you. They would also impose this unnecessary and objectionable clause: "Where you own Sui Generis Database Rights covered by CC BY-SA 4.0, you waive these rights. As an example, this means facts you contribute to the projects may be reused freely without attribution." That clause overrides important attribution provisions present in CC BY-SA 4.0, and would in effect create a confusing crayon license. Far from a straight license upgrade! Zazpot (talk) 01:31, 8 November 2016 (UTC)Reply

Opposition

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  1.   Oppose I like the simplified and internationalized license, it brings the understanding of it throughout the world with different languages. Though the license itself does bring much painful internal changes. I suggest to think twice before making the change since most are happy with 3.0. BrendonIrwan
  2.   Strong oppose I think Wikipedia has enough b.s. Anymore b.s. might result in a lot of people gagging to death because b.s. stinks. Do you like b.s.? This new version 4.0. promises to give you some more b.s., if you vote it in. It will also make things even more complicated than they already are. See, there's some pros to this new version. That is, if you're a fan of absolute b.s. Infopage100 (talk) 02:11, 3 November 2016 (UTC)Reply
    • IIUC, CC BY-SA 3.0 implicitly waives various rights to the extent necessary for the license to work as intended, and completely fails to account for database rights. CC BY-SA 4.0, by contrast, explicitly waives those rights to the extent necessary for the license to be meaningful. Performing that waiver explicitly reduces confusion and legal risk for all involved. Overall, that seems to me to amount to a way to reduce the risk of "b.s." in the long run. Zazpot (talk) 20:39, 5 November 2016 (UTC)Reply
  3.   Oppose The reasons for BY-SA are not strong. If one seeks openness and freedom then CC0 is ideal, CC-BY is next best. SA is actually quite restrictive as it prevents use in most commercial works.
    • The reasons for BY-SA are not strong. False. Wikipedia already uses CC BY-SA, and has strong reasons for doing so, including the fact that many editors would be unhappy to work without attribution or at the risk of having their contributions subsumed into a proprietary product. If one seeks openness and freedom then CC0 is ideal, CC-BY is next best. False again. CC0 would allow the creation of closed forks of Wikipedia, whereas BY-SA ensures any derived works must be free and open. Regardless, as Wikipedia is already using CC BY-SA 3.0, it cannot migrate to CC0, as that would breach the terms under which it has licensed the content from its contributors. Zazpot (talk) 19:54, 5 November 2016 (UTC)Reply
  4. Why would you do that?
    • IIUC, CC BY-SA 3.0 implicitly waives various rights to the extent necessary for the license to work as intended, and completely fails to account for database rights. CC BY-SA 4.0, by contrast, explicitly waives those rights to the extent necessary for the license to be meaningful. Performing that waiver explicitly reduces confusion and legal risk for all involved. Zazpot (talk) 20:39, 5 November 2016 (UTC)Reply
  5. I oppose! Period. 'Nuff said.
  6.   Oppose Proponents have not yet made a compelling case for the change. What bad things are currently happening that motivate the change? What exactly is broken? Prove it is broken before taking action to fix it.
    • (I wish you had signed your comment so I could ping you to see this reply.) Creative Commons has stated that the 4.0 version of the licence was written to adapt the license to the practicality of enforcing a CC licence in multiple jurisdictions that each have their own version of copyright law -- some with conflicting provisions. It also clarifies that some practices are permitted, such as linking to an attribution page, instead of forcing re-users to list the attributions on the same page as the content. (Imagine if each contributor had to be listed on the same page as content on Wikipedia -- such a list could easily be longer than the article!) Etamni | ✉  10:54, 12 October 2016 (UTC)Reply
  7.   Oppose Same as above. I fail to understand a reason for the upgrade. Also, I don't see how we can do a site-wide license change when only a very tiny part of users will see this discussion and even lesser users will actually vote on this. In lieu of a more friendly word, this looks like a waste of resources to me :-\ -- Evilninja (talk)
    • IIUC, CC BY-SA 3.0 implicitly waives various rights to the extent necessary for the license to work as intended, and completely fails to account for database rights. CC BY-SA 4.0, by contrast, explicitly waives those rights to the extent necessary for the license to be meaningful. Those are the advantages. As for your concern about the license upgrade: CC BY-SA 3.0 explicitly allows adapted works to use a later version of the CC BY-SA license, so there's no problem on that score. Zazpot (talk) 20:39, 5 November 2016 (UTC)Reply
  8.   Oppose almost everyone who opposes this is giving reasons, most of the support is given without any explination
  9.   Oppose too much DRM. well you get what I mean. it would just make it harder for things to work.
  10.   Oppose Due to copyright law being extremely broken internationally broken (I.E.: copyright after the person is dead, copyright for multiple decades), I cannot support this. As an author, reader, and user of information, red tape just hurts the flow of information, and the people that it's supposed to protect. Keep things open.
    • That is a muddled objection. Wikipedia cannot avoid copyright law. The CC BY-SA licenses are designed precisely to ease the flow (sharing; reuse; collaborative editing) of information. CC BY-SA 4.0 removes some hurdles to this that CC BY-SA 3.0 does not account for, so probably you ought to be supporting the proposed change. Zazpot (talk) 19:54, 5 November 2016 (UTC)Reply
  11. Tentatively   Oppose the ToS changes. I'm not OK with abandoning copyleft for data, though I am OK with a move to CC BY-SA 4.0. CC BY-SA 4.0 fixes a problem in earlier licenses with respect to sui generis database rights (SGDR) that the proposed ToS changes UNfix! I read the justification at Luis Villa's blog (linked to from FAQ Why do the proposed amendment to the terms of use mention sui generis database rights?, above), and notice that there are no examples presented to back his claims.
    What could convince me to change my !vote? A real or realistic example where straight CC-BY-SA-4.0 is a problem, but this weird special version wouldn't be, that I would actually want to support. Also, it's undefined what will actually change, UI-wise, which is important. See #Elvey (was #Elvey) for discussion. --Elvey (talk) 23:04, 6 October 2016 (UTC). Pinging Joe Sutherland (WMF) as a courtesy, apropos change above.Reply
  12. It seems to give another non-profit power and control over wikipedia, in the long run. 2601:1C2:1300:D091:1FA:2FFD:DACE:D94D 05:29, 6 October 2016 (UTC)Reply
  13. IDK if Wikipedia should do this68.12.229.92 03:29, 6 October 2016 (UTC)Reply
  14. Wikipedia works fine the way it is. Don't try to fix things that aren't broken. That's what government does and look where that's got us. Just leave Wikipedia as it is.
    • That is a muddled objection. Wikipedia works as well as it does precisely because of good governance, including the decision to adopt the most appropriate licensing scheme available: GFDL to begin with; and then CC BY-SA 3.0 + GFDL when that became possible. Migrating to CC BY-SA 4.0 + GFDL appears to possess some small but concrete advantages, and it is right that the community should consider benefiting from them. Zazpot (talk) 21:10, 5 November 2016 (UTC)Reply
  15.   Oppose because of waiving sui generis database rights and moral, personality, and privacy rights. —MarcoAurelio 15:36, 6 October 2016 (UTC)Reply
  16. Segregation of knowledge commons is tomorrows biggest industry. Goodbye By saving changes, you agree to the Terms of Use, and you irrevocably agree to release your contribution under the CC BY-SA 3.0 License and the GFDL. You agree that a hyperlink or URL is sufficient attribution under the Creative Commons license.
  17. Thw old knowlegr base (which is older,let say, years) sould not to be licensed
    • That is a muddled objection. If it wasn't licensed, Wikipedia would be impossible because it would be unlawful for the Wikimedia Foundation to distribute the contributors' copyrighted work, and unlawful for other editors to collaboratively edit it and re-license the resulting derived work. Zazpot (talk) 19:54, 5 November 2016 (UTC)Reply
  18. The juvenile delinquents who sold us computers and software always ask for an "upgrade" that diminishes application functionality and restricts and eliminates rights first purchased by the user, they have now turned their smartphones and computers to the task of advertisement platform to sell the unneeded and unwanted. Please WIKI don't go down that evil path. Extraneous Note: By the way, same thing happens with learning curves, up the hill,, up the hill again, and again, and again until the last becomes insurmountable so that the functionality of the hardware and software is not only degraded it becomes totally dysfunctional. You could chart the economic outcome along the glut of plder, less gymnastic, elders are there.
  19. I agree withthe below comment. Bschandrasgr (talk) 08:49, 6 October 2016 (UTC)kn:ಸದಸ್ಯ:BschandrasgrReply
  20.   Oppose - Don't fix what's not broken. And user who gave something free under a lower license, must that all be changed? Let it stay like it is. - Richardkiwi (talk) 18:46, 6 October 2016 (UTC)Reply
  21. Don't do it would be a waste of time and it might screw up peoples accounts — The preceding unsigned comment was added by Demoscout (talk)
  22. We risk striking discord with EU-law if we forcibly upgrade any content licenced under CC-3.0 due to the clause concerning personal and privacy rights. At the same time any benefits are at best hypothetical, seeing as we are entirely unable to police the breaches of licence that already exist. Hence we are stuck with a very time-consuming task that has very little positive impact, and which potentially could get us stuck in a whole slew of legislative battles. Neither am I comfortable with signing off my moral rights or with decreasing the attribution requirements of my work. CFCF 💌 📧 20:52, 6 October 2016 (UTC)Reply
  23. Oppose - I do not understand why creatives should waive their "moral, personality, and privacy rights". I don't exactly understand what these rights entail, but Wikimedia projects have a 15 year history of free content without waiving those rights. Over the last several years, I have approached multiple third parties regarding free-use media releases for Wikimedia Commons, and have always recommended CC-BY-SA 3.0 because it retained these rights. If content can be shared freely without waiving these rights, they should be retained. - hahnchen (talk) 21:39, 6 October 2016 (UTC)Reply
    • IIUC, CC BY-SA 3.0 implicitly waives those rights to the extent necessary for the license to be meaningful. CC BY-SA 4.0, by contrast, explicitly waives those rights to the extent necessary for the license to be meaningful. Performing that waiver explicitly reduces confusion and legal risk for all involved. Zazpot (talk) 19:54, 5 November 2016 (UTC)Reply
  24.   Strong opposeI dont like this - this is going to be bad for everyone - Georgy
  25. Oppose - Authors should not waive their "moral, personality, and privacy rights". European folk have (due to past history) a very strong interest in preserving privacy and moral rights. These must not be abused. After review of the changes in detail there could be major problems which might (Germany!) cause the wiki to be taken down or ISP in EU not to permit access if these fundamental moral, privacy rights are abused or attempted to be given up in CC by SA 4. Stick to CC by SA 3. And convert it for international use rather than jump to a disputatious version 4 which might cause EU abandonment of wiki. eionmac
  26.   Oppose- I do not want to signoff my moral rights and to endorse unjustified significants changes like you suggest
  27.   Oppose- I disagree with the idea of applying creative commons(CC). Since the wiki is made by many people it is not one's information. The Ideas and Concepts that are updated here aren't for financial advances either. Making CC will also make people to put their names on the webpage which is very vulnerable to the Crackers(Vicious hackers). Also this will discourage people to use the wiki because putting a name on the web will lessen the trust in the either way when the writer is not famous in that subject and this will also make people to be discouraged to change, edit wiki because the original writer is famous professor. Kevin
    • That is a muddled objection. Wikipedia already uses CC BY-SA 3.0. It has strong reasons for using BY-SA, including the fact that many editors would be unhappy to work without attribution or at the risk of having their contributions subsumed into a proprietary product. And the concern about contributors having to provide their names is inapplicable to this discussion, because neither CC BY-SA 3.0 nor CC BY-SA 4.0 would require contributions to be onymous. Zazpot (talk) 20:32, 5 November 2016 (UTC)Reply
  28.   Oppose- I disagree, moral rights are very important and applying the creative commons would strip us of our moral rights. We are human beings and we deserve to keep our moral rights.
  29.   Oppose- It should be public domain, since entered by public
    • That is a muddled objection. Wikipedia cannot avoid copyright law. If you mean Wikipedia should adopt a CC0 license: well, that is a non-starter, because Wikipedia is already using CC BY-SA 3.0. Therefore, migrating to CC0 would breach the terms under which the Wikimedia Foundation has licensed the content from Wikipedia's editors. Moreover, CC0 would allow the creation of proprietary ("closed") forks of Wikipedia, whereas BY-SA ensures any derived works must be free and open. Zazpot (talk) 20:32, 5 November 2016 (UTC)Reply
  30.   Oppose Moral rights as defined by the Berne Convention include:
    • the right to claim attribution for your work
    • the right to publish a work anonymously or pseudonymously
    • the right to protect a work from being used to denigrate the author
    These rights are separate from the copyright to a work and can never be transferred, but the author can waive them at any time. The Creative Commons 4.0 licenses make you do that. Update 3.0 license and use that instead. Nlaylah (talk) 00:59, 8 October 2016 (UTC)Reply
    • IIUC, CC BY-SA 3.0 implicitly waives those rights to the extent necessary for the license to be meaningful. CC BY-SA 4.0, by contrast, explicitly waives those rights to the extent necessary for the license to be meaningful. Performing that waiver explicitly reduces confusion and legal risk for all involved. Zazpot (talk) 20:32, 5 November 2016 (UTC)Reply
  31.   Oppose "The ported versions of CC BY-SA 3.0 were substantially similar to each other, but included some legal modifications to reflect the local jurisdiction." So the translated one will force some pointless laws upon all of the internet not that specific country.
  32.   Oppose because of the already-mentioned waiving of sui generis database rights and moral, personality, and privacy rights. --Robkelk (talk) 19:15, 8 October 2016 (UTC)Reply
  33.   Oppose the wrong way!!! It will be better: the new whole work that included free licensed parts, must be also free under the same license. --Alchemist-hp (talk) 20:33, 8 October 2016 (UTC)Reply
  34. Just a simple NO is my hope... — The preceding unsigned comment was added by 85.76.74.204 (talk)
  35. absolutely not 2602:304:B162:1000:645E:1307:9B3:A8F9 20:02, 8 October 2016 (UTC)
  36.   Oppose erneute Zwangsumlizenzierung gegen den Willen der Urheber - und dann gleich so schön schwammig formuliert, daß man sich das in Zukunft ganz spart. Welche Katze im Sack wird damit erkauft? Richtig, niemand weiß es, weil niemand vorhersagen kann, ob CC-6 nicht vielleicht PD sein wird. Möglich ist alles. Nachdem mal die komplette Wikipedia unter GFDL stand und man heute nur noch mit Mühe einen Verweis darauf findet, ist sowas auch keineswegs an den Haaren herbeigezogen. Falls es dauzu kommen sollte, werde ich Texte mit Schöpfungshöhe nur noch unter GFDL veröffentlichen - also nicht mehr in diesen Projekten. Bei Bildern halte ich es wegen der Zwangslizenzänderung ja schon lange so. --Ralf Roletschek (talk) 21:37, 8 October 2016 (UTC)Reply
  37. No, not a good idea
  38.   Oppose В 4-ой версии отсутсвуют внятные и понятные условия использования. У меня такое ощущение, что Фонд Викимедиа пытается обмануть редакторов ВП. По крайней мере меня лично они точно пытаются обвести вокруг пальца... С уважением, 0x0F (talk) 02:11, 10 October 2016 (UTC)Reply
  39.   Strong oppose - Changing to Creative Commons will impede the flow of information, not promote it. Wikipedia contributions come from all strata of the public and therefore should belong to the public as a whole. The goal of Wikipedia is the free flow of information, not attribution of information to specific authors or ensuring that subsequent information is passed on under copyright. The very act of copyrighting the information on Wikipedia goes against these founding principles. Furthermore CC 4.0 is the most restrictive CC copyright to date and even forces contributors to waive their moral rights which would be deeply unfair to the personal interests of the individual contributors. I also find retroactively changing the license that people had previously published under (essentially without the individual contributor's consent) to be unfair and in very bad taste.-- BaronVonchesto (talk) 06:26, 10 October 2016 (UTC)Reply
    • That is a muddled objection. Wikipedia cannot avoid copyright law. If you mean Wikipedia should adopt a CC0 license: well, that is a non-starter, because Wikipedia is already using CC BY-SA 3.0. Therefore, migrating to CC0 would breach the terms under which the Wikimedia Foundation has licensed the content from Wikipedia's editors. Moreover, CC0 would allow the creation of proprietary ("closed") forks of Wikipedia, whereas BY-SA ensures any derived works must be free and open. Zazpot (talk) 20:32, 5 November 2016 (UTC)Reply
  40.   Strong oppose we want free flow of information 10 October 2016 .(talk) .
    • That is a muddled objection. Wikipedia cannot avoid copyright law. If you mean Wikipedia should adopt a CC0 license: well, that is a non-starter, because Wikipedia is already using CC BY-SA 3.0. Therefore, migrating to CC0 would breach the terms under which the Wikimedia Foundation has licensed the content from Wikipedia's editors. Moreover, CC0 would allow the creation of proprietary ("closed") forks of Wikipedia, whereas BY-SA ensures any derived works must be free and open. Zazpot (talk) 20:32, 5 November 2016 (UTC)Reply
  41.   Strong oppose This revision contributes to authors losing even more rights and makes it much more difficult to persecute use without proper attribution. Also, we could lose the freedom to intervene/caucus if further changes/revisions restrict our rights even more. --212.201.68.244 12:56, 10 October 2016 (UTC)Reply
    • Nobody should be persecuting anybody. As for the rights issue: IIUC, CC BY-SA 3.0 implicitly waives those rights to the extent necessary for the license to be meaningful. CC BY-SA 4.0, by contrast, explicitly waives those rights to the extent necessary for the license to be meaningful. Performing that waiver explicitly reduces confusion and legal risk for all involved. Zazpot (talk) 20:32, 5 November 2016 (UTC)Reply
  42.   Oppose per Nlaylah. I choose to contribute anonomously, so I'm particularily concerned about waiving my moral right to do so, which this new licence seems to require.Godsy (talkcontribs) 16:52, 10 October 2016 (UTC)Reply
    • IIUC, CC BY-SA 3.0 implicitly waives those rights to the extent necessary for the license to be meaningful. CC BY-SA 4.0, by contrast, explicitly waives those rights to the extent necessary for the license to be meaningful. Performing that waiver explicitly reduces confusion and legal risk for all involved. Zazpot (talk) 20:32, 5 November 2016 (UTC)Reply
  43.   Oppose. Tried to remake up my mind three times, but still: I don't think WMF should relicense the work we volunteers have done over the years on a basis summarizable as "we think we can". This is beside other things also a matter of respect. And, moreover, I simply prefer certain details of our current license to certain details of the proposed license. → «« Man77 »» [de] 20:21, 10 October 2016 (UTC)Reply
    • I don't think WMF should relicense the work we volunteers have done over the years on a basis summarizable as "we think we can". CC BY-SA 3.0 explicitly allows adapted works to use a later version of the CC BY-SA license, so there's no problem on that score. Zazpot (talk) 20:32, 5 November 2016 (UTC)Reply
  44.   Oppose Wiki is made by many people it is not one's information to be licensed at all. Alex Khimich (talk) 07:37, 11 October 2016 (UTC)Reply
    • That is a muddled objection. Wikipedia cannot avoid copyright law. If you mean Wikipedia should adopt a CC0 license: well, that is a non-starter, because Wikipedia is already using CC BY-SA 3.0. Therefore, migrating to CC0 would breach the terms under which the Wikimedia Foundation has licensed the content from Wikipedia's editors. Moreover, CC0 would allow the creation of proprietary ("closed") forks of Wikipedia, whereas BY-SA ensures any derived works must be free and open. Zazpot (talk) 20:32, 5 November 2016 (UTC)Reply
  45.   Oppose I do not support this change, free information should be left as it is.
    • That is a muddled objection. Wikipedia cannot avoid copyright law. If you mean Wikipedia should adopt a CC0 license: well, that is a non-starter, because Wikipedia is already using CC BY-SA 3.0. Therefore, migrating to CC0 would breach the terms under which the Wikimedia Foundation has licensed the content from Wikipedia's editors. Moreover, CC0 would allow the creation of proprietary ("closed") forks of Wikipedia, whereas BY-SA ensures any derived works must be free and open. Zazpot (talk) 20:32, 5 November 2016 (UTC)Reply
  46.   Oppose If it isn't broken, don't replace it!
  47.   Oppose There is no practical reason to make this change -- there is no problem to be solved by changing the license. Jarmihi (talk) 14:43, 11 October 2016 (UTC)Reply
    • IIUC, CC BY-SA 3.0 implicitly waives various rights to the extent necessary for the license to work as intended, and completely fails to account for database rights. CC BY-SA 4.0, by contrast, explicitly waives those rights to the extent necessary for the license to be meaningful. Performing that waiver explicitly reduces confusion and legal risk for all involved. Zazpot (talk) 20:32, 5 November 2016 (UTC)Reply
  48. 2606:A000:6959:9C00:B1F1:386F:1B95:3A2F 13:12, 9 October 2016 (UTC) (NCFriend)Reply
  49.   Strong oppose J'utilise la Cc-by-sa 3.0 pour mes textes et je ne suis absolument pas décidé à changer pour une licence qui présente quelques différences. Jérémy-Günther-Heinz Jähnick (talk) 12:18, 12 October 2016 (UTC)Reply
  50.   Oppose Relicensing and the waiving of certain rights - both ideas are bad. And the very biased introduction text raises suspicion. That's not a promising start of a decent conversation. Brisbane (talk) 14:24, 12 October 2016 (UTC)Reply
  51. No, as this website has helped millions of people complete their reports and other people could simply be easiealy sued — The preceding unsigned comment was added by 99.232.195.244 (talk)
  52.   Oppose; upgrading and waiving sui generis database rights are two independent decisions. 177.156.4.90 03:06, 13 October 2016 (UTC)Reply
  53.   Oppose for the reason outlined below: --G(x) (talk) 07:54, 13 October 2016 (UTC)Reply
    1. The license just wrote away the moral rights to the extent permitted by law. I find the moral rights, though not explicitly and universally recognized, is the right that should be upheld. Otherwise, the author would be subject to detrimental criticism without an opportunity to disprove.
    2. The concept of automatic reinstatement of license upon rectification of violation may prove to be troublesome to enforce, as the provision does not address whether it will prohibit the claims to be brought during the violation up until the license is restored.
  54.   Oppose A more restrictive license adds nothing to a free encyclopedia on the contrary, difficult to use and creation and also requiring publishers to give up their moral rights, which is unfair and unlawful. Petronas (talk) 09:58, 13 October 2016 (UTC)Reply
  55.   Strong oppose The more you continue to increase the number of rules, the less you will find contemporary witnesses who are ready to write entries.
  56.   Oppose The required waiver of certain ancillary rights (including but not limited to moral rights), in my opinion, is a major misstep for Creative Commons. I unfortunately cannot support such a change. ViperSnake151 (talk) 15:44, 13 October 2016 (UTC)Reply
  57.   Oppose We need to abandon CC-BY-SA in favor of the Peer Production License. --L3lackEyedAngels (talk) 15:50, 13 October 2016 (UTC)Reply
  58.   Oppose No need
    • IIUC, CC BY-SA 3.0 implicitly waives various rights to the extent necessary for the license to work as intended, and completely fails to account for database rights. CC BY-SA 4.0, by contrast, explicitly waives those rights to the extent necessary for the license to be meaningful. Performing that waiver explicitly reduces confusion and legal risk for all involved. Zazpot (talk) 21:00, 5 November 2016 (UTC)Reply
  59. Strong oppose! Stay with 3.0 — The preceding unsigned comment was added by 157.246.83.64 (talk) 2016-10-13T17:24:35 (UTC)
  60.   Oppose for now until WMF satisfactorily explain why it is necessary for contributers to waive their moral rights. Yes I've read the explanation that this is to make reuse easier, but I have yet to see a concrete example of how my moral rights have got in the way of reuse of anything. SpinningSpark 15:42, 14 October 2016 (UTC)Reply
    • IIUC, CC BY-SA 3.0 implicitly waives various rights to the extent necessary for the license to work as intended, and completely fails to account for database rights. CC BY-SA 4.0, by contrast, explicitly waives those rights to the extent necessary for the license to be meaningful. Performing that waiver explicitly reduces confusion and legal risk for all involved. Zazpot (talk) 21:00, 5 November 2016 (UTC)Reply
  61.   Oppose I believe that Wikipedia should be in public domain
    • That is a muddled objection. Wikipedia cannot avoid copyright law. If you mean Wikipedia should adopt a CC0 license: well, that is a non-starter, because Wikipedia is already using CC BY-SA 3.0. Therefore, migrating to CC0 would breach the terms under which the Wikimedia Foundation has licensed the content from Wikipedia's editors. Moreover, CC0 would allow the creation of proprietary ("closed") forks of Wikipedia, whereas BY-SA ensures any derived works must be free and open. Zazpot (talk) 21:00, 5 November 2016 (UTC)Reply
  62.   Oppose Version 3.0 is sufficient.
  63.   Oppose Freedom also means to respect the decision by earlier uploaders on their free choice for a license. Having said that, I do appreaciate the option to choose for CC-BY-SA-4.0 - Perhaps though, Wikimedia should be a more active participant in the process of creating new Creative Commons versions. Our community is significant in size and steady in it's presence. It could assist in the creation of new CC versions that are more widely supported. --OSeveno (talk) 12:08, 15 October 2016 (UTC)Reply
    • CC BY-SA 3.0 explicitly allows adapted works to use a later version of the CC BY-SA license, so it is mistaken to suggest that upgrading to 4.0 in any way disrespects the wishes of users who contributed under CC BY-SA 3.0. Zazpot (talk) 21:00, 5 November 2016 (UTC)Reply
  64.   Oppose as many above. After the incredible GFDL-to-CC switch the next slapping into the face of the contributors. WMF lacks respect for the work of the authors. NNW (talk) 15:58, 15 October 2016 (UTC)Reply
    • CC BY-SA 3.0 explicitly allows adapted works to use a later version of the CC BY-SA license, so it is mistaken to suggest that upgrading to 4.0 in any way disrespects the wishes of users who contributed under CC BY-SA 3.0. Zazpot (talk) 21:00, 5 November 2016 (UTC)Reply
  65.   OpposeWiki content is freely donated and should be in the public domain. Creative Commons, GNU, etc. are all complex schemes designed to create restrictions on the dissemination of knowledge. So-called "free" licensing schemes merely create opportunities for litigation that is anathema to the concept of the res publica.
    • That is a muddled objection. Wikipedia cannot avoid copyright law. If you mean Wikipedia should adopt a CC0 license: well, that is a non-starter, because Wikipedia is already using CC BY-SA 3.0. Therefore, migrating to CC0 would breach the terms under which the Wikimedia Foundation has licensed the content from Wikipedia's editors. Moreover, CC0 would allow the creation of proprietary ("closed") forks of Wikipedia, whereas BY-SA ensures any derived works must be free and open. Zazpot (talk) 21:00, 5 November 2016 (UTC)Reply
  66.   Oppose I think that Wikipedia must be in public domain ! IuvenesIos (talk) 09:26, 17 October 2016 (UTC)Reply
    • That is a muddled objection. Wikipedia cannot avoid copyright law. If you mean Wikipedia should adopt a CC0 license: well, that is a non-starter, because Wikipedia is already using CC BY-SA 3.0. Therefore, migrating to CC0 would breach the terms under which the Wikimedia Foundation has licensed the content from Wikipedia's editors. Moreover, CC0 would allow the creation of proprietary ("closed") forks of Wikipedia, whereas BY-SA ensures any derived works must be free and open. Zazpot (talk) 21:00, 5 November 2016 (UTC)Reply
  67. Would the world be better off if the Bible, Plato, Mark Twain or the US Constitution were licensed under the Creative Commons 3.0 or 4.0? What a silly question. "Free" is free and anything else is not free.
    • That is a muddled objection. Wikipedia cannot avoid copyright law. If you mean Wikipedia should adopt a CC0 license: well, that is a non-starter, because Wikipedia is already using CC BY-SA 3.0. Therefore, migrating to CC0 would breach the terms under which the Wikimedia Foundation has licensed the content from Wikipedia's editors. Moreover, CC0 would allow the creation of proprietary ("closed") forks of Wikipedia, whereas BY-SA ensures any derived works must be free and open. Zazpot (talk) 21:00, 5 November 2016 (UTC)Reply
  68.   Strong oppose - This was created by the public and should remain in the public. Any other licensing has not been tested well enough by court systems. In the long run, any other licensing schema besides public domain would hurt the potential for Wikipedia to remain freely accessible to all publics.
    • That is a muddled objection. First of all, CC licenses have so far held up well in court. In any case, Wikipedia cannot avoid copyright law. If you mean Wikipedia should adopt a CC0 license: well, that is a non-starter, because Wikipedia is already using CC BY-SA 3.0. Therefore, migrating to CC0 would breach the terms under which the Wikimedia Foundation has licensed the content from Wikipedia's editors. Moreover, CC0 would allow the creation of proprietary ("closed") forks of Wikipedia, whereas BY-SA ensures any derived works must be free and open. Zazpot (talk) 21:00, 5 November 2016 (UTC)Reply
  69.   Strong oppose Is not necessary. Why we not stay at 3.0? -- Freddy2001 talk 11:26, 17 October 2016 (UTC)Reply
    • IIUC, CC BY-SA 3.0 implicitly waives various rights to the extent necessary for the license to work as intended, and completely fails to account for database rights. CC BY-SA 4.0, by contrast, explicitly waives those rights to the extent necessary for the license to be meaningful. Performing that waiver explicitly reduces confusion and legal risk for all involved. Zazpot (talk) 21:00, 5 November 2016 (UTC)Reply
  70.   Oppose – I don’t see the point, why we should stop using 3.0. Were there any problems with 3.0? – KPFC (talk) 12:56, 17 October 2016 (UTC)Reply
    • IIUC, CC BY-SA 3.0 implicitly waives various rights to the extent necessary for the license to work as intended, and completely fails to account for database rights. CC BY-SA 4.0, by contrast, explicitly waives those rights to the extent necessary for the license to be meaningful. Performing that waiver explicitly reduces confusion and legal risk for all involved. Zazpot (talk) 21:00, 5 November 2016 (UTC)Reply
  71.   Oppose Stay for now, at least until the proposal is improved.--Rainer (talk) 16:04, 17 October 2016 (UTC)Reply
  72.   Oppose --Olei (talk) 22:10, 17 October 2016 (UTC)Reply
  73. No! 141.62.193.34 09:44, 18 October 2016 (UTC)Reply
  74. A simple no it mean more lock down control the very creation was to be free . — The preceding unsigned comment was added by 79.67.32.72 (talk) 13:50, 20 October 2016 (UTC)Reply
    • That is a muddled objection. Wikipedia cannot avoid copyright law. If you mean Wikipedia should adopt a CC0 license: well, that is a non-starter, because Wikipedia is already using CC BY-SA 3.0. Therefore, migrating to CC0 would breach the terms under which the Wikimedia Foundation has licensed the content from Wikipedia's editors. Moreover, CC0 would allow the creation of proprietary ("closed") forks of Wikipedia, whereas BY-SA ensures any derived works must be free and open. Zazpot (talk) 21:00, 5 November 2016 (UTC)Reply
  75.   Strong oppose due to waiving of moral rights without sufficient explanation of why this is necessary in practical terms, and moreover because I am opposed on principle to the 30-day automatic reinstatement window. BethNaught (talk) 18:46, 21 October 2016 (UTC)Reply
  76.   Oppose Why 6.0? Wikipedia is a public page were anyone can post and share information. In 6.0 it will be a Private project
  77.   Strong Oppose The proposal does not mention some other major changes in 4.0, including a waiver of moral rights. 4.0 also is an invitation to ignore license terms. --Martina Nolte (talk) 21:41, 22 October 2016 (UTC)Reply
  78.   Strong Oppose There is no need for change. This process strikes me as needless bureaucracy for the sake of it. Stop wasting all of our time and let us continue to contribute under familiar and proven terms. Content is free enough right now, with no demonstrated problems. We've all had enough of lawyers, let them rot and stop giving them business. Pratyeka (talk) 07:42, 23 October 2016 (UTC)Reply
    • IIUC, CC BY-SA 3.0 implicitly waives various rights to the extent necessary for the license to work as intended, and completely fails to account for database rights. CC BY-SA 4.0, by contrast, explicitly waives those rights to the extent necessary for the license to be meaningful. Performing that waiver explicitly reduces confusion and legal risk for all involved. In other words, it is designed to make it less likely that litigation would occur in relation to content uploaded to Wikimedia Foundation projects. So, please consider revising your position. Zazpot (talk) 21:00, 5 November 2016 (UTC)Reply
  79.   Strong Oppose. --Mautpreller (talk) 09:58, 23 October 2016 (UTC)Reply
  80. This not a great idea 163.150.228.198 17:35, 25 October 2016 (UTC)Reply
  81.   Strong Oppose Why changing when what we have is enough? I don't see any value of it.117.2.36.3 02:39, 26 October 2016 (UTC)Reply
    • IIUC, CC BY-SA 3.0 implicitly waives various rights to the extent necessary for the license to work as intended, and completely fails to account for database rights. CC BY-SA 4.0, by contrast, explicitly waives those rights to the extent necessary for the license to be meaningful. Performing that waiver explicitly reduces confusion and legal risk for all involved. Zazpot (talk) 21:00, 5 November 2016 (UTC)Reply
  82.   Strong oppose cc4.0的相关的释权条款相比3.0完全不能被接受Edisonabcd (talk) 03:18, 26 October 2016 (UTC)Reply
  83.   Strong oppose Stuff on wikimedia may be other people's work, so it's not fair if you copyright it.
    • That is a muddled objection. Wikipedia cannot avoid copyright law. If you mean Wikipedia should adopt a CC0 license: well, that is a non-starter, because Wikipedia is already using CC BY-SA 3.0. Therefore, migrating to CC0 would breach the terms under which the Wikimedia Foundation has licensed the content from Wikipedia's editors. Moreover, CC0 would allow the creation of proprietary ("closed") forks of Wikipedia, whereas BY-SA ensures any derived works must be free and open. Zazpot (talk) 21:00, 5 November 2016 (UTC)Reply
  84.   Strong oppose CC3 is about copyright and only copyright. It had never occurred to me that someone would attempt to use the "or any subsequent version" loophole in the license wording to sign away other rights on my behalf, without my informed consent, such as personality rights or moral rights. I'm not OK with this. Who is to say that a subsequent version isn't going to sign away more of my rights, assets or possessions? I'm also not OK with the manner in which CC4 is weakening or undermining the provision that, if someone violates the licence terms, their use of the licensed material ends immediately and unconditionally (now - not 30 days from now, maybe, if they feel like it). Those rights matter as they're all that's preventing others from stealing my Wikivoyage contributions, copy-pasting them into Wikitravel without attribution and digging en:voy: a little deeper into the duplicate-content search penalty hole which is already hurting a good project. CC4 is flawed, fatally flawed. I want nothing to do with it. All that Wikimedia going from CC3 to CC4 would accomplish is to force re-users of Wikimedia content to also adopt CC4 instead of CC3. That's not a step forward and I strongly oppose this. K7L (talk) 05:06, 31 October 2016 (UTC)Reply
  85.   Strong oppose Stuff on wikimedia may be other people's work, so it's not fair if you copyright it. Therefore: please erase the images that I uploaded (and all my edits) - or we'll make a deal: 90% of cash for me, 10% for wikipedia. Quite fair, isn't it? Tonton Bernardo (talk) 09:11, 1 November 2016 (UTC)Reply
    • That is a muddled objection. Wikipedia cannot avoid copyright law. If you mean Wikipedia should adopt a CC0 license: well, that is a non-starter, because Wikipedia is already using CC BY-SA 3.0. Therefore, migrating to CC0 would breach the terms under which the Wikimedia Foundation has licensed the content from Wikipedia's editors. Moreover, CC0 would allow the creation of proprietary ("closed") forks of Wikipedia, whereas BY-SA ensures any derived works must be free and open. Zazpot (talk) 21:00, 5 November 2016 (UTC)Reply
  86.   Strong Oppose Me too! I don't think this change is even necessary.
    • IIUC, CC BY-SA 3.0 implicitly waives various rights to the extent necessary for the license to work as intended, and completely fails to account for database rights. CC BY-SA 4.0, by contrast, explicitly waives those rights to the extent necessary for the license to be meaningful. Performing that waiver explicitly reduces confusion and legal risk for all involved. That might not be strictly necessary, but it does seem worthwhile. Zazpot (talk) 21:00, 5 November 2016 (UTC)Reply
  87.   Strong Oppose --Haeferl (talk) 18:02, 2 November 2016 (UTC) like Martina NolteReply