Translation of the week/2020 translations/Archive

en:Bernwood ForestEdit

(Net support = 4; Against = 0%)

Bernwood Forest was one of several forests of the ancient Kingdom of England and was a Royal hunting forest. It is thought to have been set aside as Royal hunting land when the Anglo-Saxon kings had a palace at Brill and church in Oakley, in the 10th century and was a particularly favoured place of Edward the Confessor, who was born in nearby Islip.

  Support

  1. --Shizhao (talk) 02:02, 30 March 2020 (UTC)
  2. --Ameisenigel (talk) 08:10, 30 March 2020 (UTC)
  3. --Erebuss (talk) 08:19, 8 April 2020 (UTC)
  4. --Deryni (talk) 06:27, 3 May 2020 (UTC)

  Oppose


  Comment


see d:Q4894620

en:F. Percy SmithEdit

(Net support = 6; Against = 0%)

Frank Percy Smith (12 January 1880–24 March 1945) was a British naturalist and early nature documentary pioneer working for Charles Urban, where he pioneered the use of time-lapse and microcinematography.

  Support

  1. --Shizhao (talk) 02:49, 2 March 2020 (UTC)
  2. --Ameisenigel (talk) 08:08, 2 March 2020 (UTC)
  3. --Camouflaged Mirage (talk) 15:33, 10 March 2020 (UTC)
  4. --Super Wang hates PC You hate, too? 14:43, 20 March 2020 (UTC)
  5. --Alexmar983 (talk) 15:19, 27 April 2020 (UTC)
  6. --Erebuss (talk) 09:16, 4 May 2020 (UTC)

  Oppose


  Comment


see d:Q5424000

en:Pour le pianoEdit

(Net support = 4; Against = 0%)

Pour le piano (For the piano), L. 95, is a suite for solo piano by Claude Debussy. It consists of three individually composed movements, Prélude, Sarabande and Toccata. The suite was completed and published in 1901. It was premiered on 11 January 1902 at the Salle Érard, played by Ricardo Viñes. Maurice Ravel orchestrated the middle movement

  Support

  1. --Shizhao (talk) 02:43, 2 March 2020 (UTC)
  2. --Ameisenigel (talk) 08:07, 2 March 2020 (UTC)
  3. --Camouflaged Mirage (talk) 15:32, 10 March 2020 (UTC)
  4. --Super Wang hates PC You hate, too? 14:44, 20 March 2020 (UTC)

  Oppose


  Comment


see d:Q7235697

en:As-NasEdit

(Net support = 5; Against = 0%)

As-Nas (آس ناس) is a card game or type of playing cards that were used in Persia. The design of the packs is simple, consisting of only five individual card designs, each with a distinctive background colour. As-Nas date back to the 17th century, and at that time a 25-card pack was used, with 5 suits, each suit having one court card and four numeral cards. Cards from the 19th century with the classic As-Nas designs can be found in various museum collections.

  Support

  1. --Uruk (talk) 16:31, 29 March 2020 (UTC)
  2. --Deryni (talk) 18:59, 29 March 2020 (UTC)
  3. --Shizhao (talk) 01:49, 30 March 2020 (UTC)
  4. --Ameisenigel (talk) 08:08, 30 March 2020 (UTC)
  5. -- Erebuss (talk) 08:17, 8 April 2020 (UTC)

  Oppose


  Comment


see d:Q19963564

en:Cloth facemaskEdit

(Net support = 7; Against = 0%)

A cloth facemask is a mask made of common textiles worn over the mouth and nose. Unlike surgical masks and respirators such as N95 masks, they are not subject to regulation, and there is currently little research or guidance on their effectiveness as a protective measure against infectious disease transmission or particulate air pollution. They were routinely used by healthcare workers from the mid 19th century until the mid 20th century. In the 1960s they fell out of use in the developed world in favor of modern surgical masks, but their use has persisted in developing countries. During the 2019–20 coronavirus pandemic, their use in developed countries was revived as a last resort due to shortages of surgical masks and respirators.

  Support

  1. I propose it as part of the effort of translating more articles related to the COVID-19 pandemics that are not strictly medical but are necessary to put concepts into a correct historic and social framework. --Alexmar983 (talk) 13:23, 5 April 2020 (UTC)
  2. --Uruk (talk) 18:50, 5 April 2020 (UTC)
  3. Sure.Camouflaged Mirage (talk) 18:53, 5 April 2020 (UTC)
  4. --Erebuss (talk) 08:20, 8 April 2020 (UTC)
  5. -- High priority. --Super Wang hates PC You hate, too? 04:32, 10 April 2020 (UTC)
  6. --Deryni (talk) 08:41, 12 April 2020 (UTC)
  7. -- Zquid (talk) 09:09, 12 April 2020 (UTC)

  Oppose


  Comment


see d:Q89480286

en:HongiEdit

(Net support = 6; Against = 0%)

The traditional Māori greeting, the hongi is performed by two people pressing their noses together; some include, at the same time, the touching of foreheads. The greeting is used at traditional meetings among Māori people, and at major ceremonies, such as a pōwhiri. It may be followed by a handshake.

  Support

  1. --Uruk (talk) 22:13, 21 March 2020 (UTC)
  2. --Deryni (talk) 08:27, 22 March 2020 (UTC)
  3. Camouflaged Mirage (talk) 08:35, 22 March 2020 (UTC)
  4. --Shizhao (talk) 06:59, 24 March 2020 (UTC)
  5. --Ameisenigel (talk) 08:04, 30 March 2020 (UTC)
  6. --Alexmar983 (talk) 17:07, 31 March 2020 (UTC)

  Oppose


  Comment


see d:Q452539

en:The Three Sisters (Alberta)Edit

(Net support = 6; Against = 20%)

The Three Sisters are a trio of peaks near Canmore, Alberta, Canada. They are known individually as Big Sister, Middle Sister and Little Sister.

  Support

  1. --Shizhao (talk) 01:55, 1 August 2019 (UTC)
  2. -- Erebuss (talk) 06:40, 1 August 2019 (UTC)
  3. --Uruk (talk) 10:05, 6 August 2019 (UTC)
  4. --Sewepb (talk) 16:08, 7 September 2019 (UTC)
  5. --Gotanda (talk) 10:19, 11 October 2019 (UTC)
  6. --Camouflaged Mirage (talk) 15:25, 10 March 2020 (UTC)
  7. --- Darwin Ahoy! 18:10, 15 March 2020 (UTC)
  8. --Ainali (talk) 18:05, 26 March 2020 (UTC)

  Oppose

  1. Really too much short. --Holapaco77 (talk) 20:20, 4 August 2019 (UTC)
  2. Needs expand. --Super Wang hates PC You hate, too? 01:08, 7 August 2019 (UTC)

  Comment "Ideal candidates shall be short and easy to translate."--Uruk (talk) 08:45, 29 August 2019 (UTC)

see d:Q1137649

en:Patricia VinnicombeEdit

(Net support = 7; Against = 0%)

Patricia Joan Vinnicombe (17 March 1932 – 30 March 2003) was a South African archaeologist and artist, known for identifying and copying San rock paintings in the valleys and foothills of the Drakensberg. Her work transformed the study of rock art into a science. She was also active in the preservation of Aboriginal art in Western Australia.

  Support

  1. Zquid (talk) 17:13, 27 February 2020 (UTC)
  2. -- Deryni (talk) 05:02, 28 February 2020 (UTC)
  3. --Ameisenigel (talk) 08:06, 2 March 2020 (UTC)
  4. --Erebuss (talk) 09:20, 2 March 2020 (UTC)
  5. --Camouflaged Mirage (talk) 15:37, 10 March 2020 (UTC)
  6. --Uruk (talk) 06:05, 14 March 2020 (UTC)
  7. Apart from some origin issues, no reason to object. --Super Wang hates PC You hate, too? 06:05, 17 March 2020 (UTC)

  Oppose


  Comment


see d:Q21598394

en:Social distancingEdit

(Net support = 8; Against = 0%)

Social distancing is a term applied to certain nonpharmaceutical infection control actions that are taken by public health officials to stop or slow down the spread of a highly contagious disease. The objective of social distancing is to reduce the probability of contact between persons carrying an infection, and others who are not infected, so as to minimize disease transmission, morbidity and ultimately, mortality

  Support

  1. as part of the interest in topic related to COVID-19 outbreak, this article is already under improvement and will be crucial as a source of information in the next weeks (spike in interest is now happening in the USA, for example). I think it's worth the effort to increase the coverage in more languages. I have also created the related commons category and infrogrpahics and videos are also currently being uploaded on the topic.--Alexmar983 (talk) 15:27, 11 March 2020 (UTC)
  2. Yeah, a good topic. Some parts are unsourced but I think this is way too important, so support.--Camouflaged Mirage (talk) 15:29, 11 March 2020 (UTC)
  3. Very good! --Holapaco77 (talk) 08:37, 12 March 2020 (UTC)
  4. --Uruk (talk) 06:08, 14 March 2020 (UTC)
  5. --Deryni (talk) 16:44, 14 March 2020 (UTC)
  6. Interesting and quite useful ATM! --- Darwin Ahoy! 18:09, 15 March 2020 (UTC)
  7. Zquid (talk) 19:04, 15 March 2020 (UTC)
  8. --Robmarotiz (talk) 00:18, 16 March 2020 (UTC)

  Oppose


  Comment Which parts are unsourced? It look decently sourced to me. They are working on it at the moment and I am sure our zh-N users can add more information from the China cases, as I can do with italy, but to me it looks like a decent density of references per lines of text.--Alexmar983 (talk) 15:52, 11 March 2020 (UTC)

Sorry, it isn't unsourced, just Examples that section seems odd. The sources seems sparse, but should be fine. --Camouflaged Mirage (talk) 15:55, 11 March 2020 (UTC)

Please notice that the number of versions is increasing, but when I proposed it was only in English.--Alexmar983 (talk) 23:54, 14 March 2020 (UTC)

see d:Q30314010

en:Hankou railway stationEdit

(Net support = 6; Against = 0%)

Hankou railway station is one of the three main railway stations in the city of Wuhan, the capital of the Hubei Province of the People's Republic of China. It is located within the section of the city commonly known as Hankou (i.e., the part of the city north of the Yangtze and Hanshui Rivers), although a fairly long distance (several kilometers) to the north from the historical center of Hankou.

  Support

  1. one of the three main railway stations in the city of Wuhan, the capital of the Hubei Province of the People's Republic of China. It has a certian relevance per se (its history is also related to the Beijing–Hankou railway) but there is a lot of attention on the area simply because of the cornoavirus outbreak. I discovered this article that way: it's close to the now-famous Huanan Seafood Wholesale Market. It is therefore related to different topics and the article is connected to highly requested articles or articles that need translation. --Alexmar983 (talk) 15:41, 5 February 2020 (UTC)
  2. --Super Wang hates PC You hate, too? 08:34, 8 February 2020 (UTC)
  3. --Holapaco77 (talk) 18:56, 24 February 2020 (UTC)
  4. --Ameisenigel (talk) 07:51, 2 March 2020 (UTC)
  5. --Erebuss (talk) 09:16, 2 March 2020 (UTC)
  6. --Deryni (talk) 09:42, 2 March 2020 (UTC)

  Oppose


  Comment


see d:Q1010546

en:The FlapperEdit

(Net support = 5; Against = 0%)

The Flapper is a 1920 American silent comedy film starring Olive Thomas. Directed by Alan Crosland, the film was the first in the United States to portray the "flapper" lifestyle, which would become a cultural craze or fad in the 1920s.

  Support

  1. --Shizhao (talk) 12:39, 15 January 2020 (UTC)
  2. Why not? --Super Wang hates PC You hate, too? 01:39, 17 January 2020 (UTC)
  3. Interesting --Ameisenigel (talk) 20:57, 18 January 2020 (UTC)
  4. we don't have a lot of articles related to cinema, I support the choice.--Alexmar983 (talk) 15:35, 5 February 2020 (UTC)
  5. --Robmarotiz (talk) 05:52, 19 February 2020 (UTC)

  Oppose


  Comment


see d:Q1752022

en:Gamla nature reserveEdit

(Net support = 7; Against = 0%)

Gamla nature reserve is a nature reserve and archaeological site located in the center of the Golan Heights, about 20 km south to the Israeli settlement of Katzrin.

  Support

  1. --Shizhao (talk) 13:53, 20 January 2020 (UTC)
  2. --Deryni (talk) 10:27, 22 January 2020 (UTC)
  3. --Ameisenigel (talk) 19:25, 25 January 2020 (UTC)
  4. I have fixed the problem reported by Super Wang. Now the reference is working. --Uruk (talk) 13:12, 27 January 2020 (UTC)
  5. --Erebuss (talk) 09:55, 3 February 2020 (UTC)
  6. Obvious Yes--Camouflaged Mirage (talk) 15:18, 14 February 2020 (UTC)
  7. --Tagasalinero (talk) 18:38, 16 February 2020 (UTC)

  Oppose

--Super Wang hates PC You hate, too? 04:08, 26 January 2020 (UTC)

  Comment

see d:Q4271763

en:Elliott BayEdit

(Net support = 7; Against = 0%)

Elliott Bay is a part of the Central Basin region of Puget Sound in Cascadia. It is in the U.S. state of Washington, extending southeastward between West Point in the north and Alki Point in the south. Seattle was founded on this body of water in the 1850s and has since grown to encompass it completely. The waterway it provides to the Pacific Ocean has served as a key element of the city's economy, enabling the Port of Seattle to become one of the busiest ports in the United States.

  Support

  1. --Shizhao (talk) 13:52, 20 January 2020 (UTC)
  2. --Super Wang hates PC You hate, too? 02:02, 25 January 2020 (UTC)
  3. --Ameisenigel (talk) 19:24, 25 January 2020 (UTC)
  4. --Deryni (talk) 08:11, 2 February 2020 (UTC)
  5. --Erebuss (talk) 09:55, 3 February 2020 (UTC)
  6. --Royal Patrol Vikarna 04:59, 10 February 2020 (UTC)
  7. --Camouflaged Mirage (talk) 15:20, 14 February 2020 (UTC)

  Oppose


  Comment


see d:Q3051501

en:Couque de DinantEdit

(Net support = 6; Against = 0%)

The Couque de Dinant (English: Cake of Dinant) is an extremely hard, sweet biscuit native to the southern Belgian city of Dinant in Wallonia.

  Support

  1. --Uruk (talk) 22:09, 3 January 2020 (UTC)
  2. --Ameisenigel (talk) 13:23, 4 January 2020 (UTC)
  3. --Shizhao (talk) 02:22, 6 January 2020 (UTC)
  4. Mouth watering. --Super Wang hates PC You hate, too? 10:05, 7 January 2020 (UTC)
  5. --Erebuss (talk) 09:54, 3 February 2020 (UTC)
  6. fine with me.--Alexmar983 (talk) 16:18, 5 February 2020 (UTC)

  Oppose


  Comment


see d:Q2579351

en:Bat-borne virusEdit

(Net support = 5; Against = 0%)

A bat-borne virus is any virus whose primary reservoir is any species of bat. The viruses species include coronaviruses, hantaviruses, lyssaviruses, SARS coronavirus, rabies virus, nipah virus, lassa virus, Henipavirus, Ebola virus and Marburg virus. Bat-borne viruses are among the most important of the emerging viruses.

  Support

  1. --Uruk (talk) 00:16, 27 January 2020 (UTC)
  2. --Imagine how I feel after translating en:Bat as food and 2019-nCoV breaks out. --Super Wang hates PC You hate, too? 11:38, 27 January 2020 (UTC)
  3. -- Deryni (talk) 10:55, 28 January 2020 (UTC)
  4. -- Zquid (talk) 13:41, 30 January 2020 (UTC)
  5. --Shizhao (talk) 13:24, 2 February 2020 (UTC)

  Oppose


  Comment I feel very sorry for all the people in China that are dealing with the present circumstances. --Uruk (talk) 12:53, 27 January 2020 (UTC)

see d:Q16243560

en:Ogden PointEdit

(Net support = 4; Against = 0%)

Ogden Point is a deep water port facility located in the southwestern corner of the city of Victoria, British Columbia, Canada. Its location in the historic and beautiful city on the southern tip of Vancouver Island, by the Strait of Juan de Fuca not far from Vancouver and Seattle, US, has made it an attractive cruise ship destination. It also serves as a ship repair and supply facility for cruise ships and other vessels such as deep sea cable laying ships. Ogden Point also has a heliport with frequent service to Vancouver Harbour, Vancouver International Airport, and Seattle. The port lies at the eastern entrance of Victoria Harbour. For smaller boats there is boat ramp for trailerable boats.

  Support

  1. --Shizhao (talk) 15:35, 26 December 2019 (UTC)
  2. -- Deryni (talk) 15:36, 26 December 2019 (UTC)
  3. --Ameisenigel (talk) 20:09, 28 December 2019 (UTC)
  4. --Super Wang hates PC You hate, too? 13:10, 10 January 2020 (UTC)

  Oppose


  Comment

see d:Q2901611

en:Patanga succinctaEdit

(Net support = 6; Against = 12.5%)

Patanga succincta, the Bombay locust, is a species of locust found in India and southeast Asia. It is usually a solitary insect, and it is only in India that it has exhibited swarming behaviour. The last plague of this locust was in that country between 1901 and 1908 and there have not been any swarms since 1927. It is thought that the behaviour of the insects has altered because of changing practices in agricultural land use.

  Support

  1. DYK in enwp --Shizhao (talk) 01:20, 9 December 2019 (UTC)
  2. --Uruk (talk) 12:36, 14 December 2019 (UTC)
  3. Short, but interesting. -- Deryni (talk) 17:58, 14 December 2019 (UTC)
  4. --Super Wang hates PC You hate, too? 10:09, 16 December 2019 (UTC)
  5. Zquid (talk) 04:03, 1 January 2020 (UTC)
  6. --Erebuss (talk) 09:36, 3 January 2020 (UTC)
  7. --Tagasalinero (talk) 06:12, 15 January 2020 (UTC)

  Oppose

  1. Not easy to translate --Sewepb (talk) 19:09, 14 December 2019 (UTC)

  Comment @Sewepb: "Not easy to translate": That is your comment to six of the suggested articles, for the time being. Perhaps you should translate from another language than English!? Deryni (talk) 12:54, 15 December 2019 (UTC)

see d:Q10621620

en:Genovese sauceEdit

(Net support = 5; Against = 0%)

Genovese sauce is a rich, onion-based pasta sauce from the region of Campania, Italy. Likely introduced to Naples from the northern Italian city of Genoa during the Renaissance, it has since become famous in Campania and forgotten elsewhere. The sauce is unusual for the long preparation time used to soften and flavor the onions.

  Support

  1. --Uruk (talk) 10:24, 30 December 2019 (UTC)
  2. --Deryni (talk) 06:21, 3 January 2020 (UTC)
  3. --Shizhao (talk) 08:00, 3 January 2020 (UTC)
  4. --Ameisenigel (talk) 13:19, 4 January 2020 (UTC)
  5. How many food-related articles will I translate this year? 😂--Super Wang hates PC You hate, too? 09:17, 8 January 2020 (UTC)

  Oppose


  Comment


see d:Q17006640

ru:Крымский мост (Москва)Edit

(en:Krymsky Bridge)

(Net support = 6; Against = 0%)

Krymsky Bridge or Crimean Bridge is a steel suspension bridge in Moscow. The bridge spans the Moskva River 1,800 metres south-west from the Kremlin and carries the Garden Ring across the river. The bridge links the Crimean Square to the north with Krymsky Val street to the south. The nearby Moscow Metro stations are Park Kultury and Oktyabrskaya.

  Support

  1. --Shizhao (talk) 15:34, 26 December 2019 (UTC)
  2. --Holapaco77 (talk) 19:23, 26 December 2019 (UTC)
  3. --Ameisenigel (talk) 20:07, 28 December 2019 (UTC)
  4. --Super Wang hates PC You hate, too? 11:14, 1 January 2020 (UTC)
  5. --Deryni (talk) 06:19, 3 January 2020 (UTC)
  6. --Erebuss (talk) 09:35, 3 January 2020 (UTC)

  Oppose


  Comment


see d:Q2361244--Shizhao (talk) 01:19, 6 January 2020 (UTC)

en:German Central Library for the BlindEdit

(Net support = 5; Against = 0%)

The German Central Library for the Blind (German: Deutsche Zentralbücherei für Blinde), abbreviated DZB, is a public library for the visually impaired located in the city of Leipzig, Saxony, Germany. Its collection of 72,300 titles is amongst the largest in the German speaking countries. The institution consists of a lending library, a publishing house, and a research center for barrier-free communication. It also has production facilities for braille books, audiobooks, and braille music. The DZB publishes about 250 new titles annually. Founded in 1894, the DZB is the oldest library for the blind in Germany.

  Support

  1. Zquid (talk) 15:18, 20 December 2019 (UTC)
  2. -- Deryni (talk) 08:00, 21 December 2019 (UTC)
  3. --Ameisenigel (talk) 22:36, 21 December 2019 (UTC)
  4. --Shizhao (talk) 02:16, 23 December 2019 (UTC)
  5. --Encore (talk) 00:46, 24 December 2019 (UTC)

  Oppose


  Comment

see d:Q1204535