Wikipedia translation of the week: 2024-25

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Tech News: 2024-25

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MediaWiki message delivery 23:49, 17 June 2024 (UTC)Reply

Sunday June 23 Strategic Wikimedia Affiliates Network meeting (WMF BoT statement on Movement Charter ratification)

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A group of SWANs heading to the meeting

Hello everyone!

The Strategic Wikimedia Affiliates Network (SWAN) is a developing forum for all Wikimedia movement affiliates to share ideas about current developments in the Wikimedia Movement. It expands on the model of the All-Affiliates Brand Meeting to help lay some of the groundwork for further Wikimedia 2030 strategy process work.

At this meeting we will focus on the recent statement by the WMF Board of Trustees liaisons statement on the Movement Charter in which the liaisons stated that they will be recommending the Board of Trustees not to ratify the final draft of the Movement Charter. The community and affiliate votes on the ratification are supposed to start on Tuesday, 25 June. This meeting offers a venue to discuss the situation and formulate the "next steps".

This month, we are meeting on Sunday, June 23, and you are all invited to RSVP here.

UTC meeting times are and

Nadzik (talk) 16:35, 22 June 2024 (UTC)Reply

Wikipedia translation of the week: 2024-26

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Tech News: 2024-26

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MediaWiki message delivery 22:32, 24 June 2024 (UTC)Reply

Wikipedia translation of the week: 2024-27

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Roller printing on fabrics is a textile printing process patented by Thomas Bell of Scotland in 1783 in an attempt to reduce the cost of the earlier copperplate printing. This method was used in Lancashire fabric mills to produce cotton dress fabrics from the 1790s, most often reproducing small monochrome patterns characterized by striped motifs and tiny dotted patterns called "machine grounds". Improvements in the technology resulted in more elaborate roller prints in bright, rich colours from the 1820s; Turkey red and chrome yellow were particularly popular.

(Please update the interwiki links on Wikidata of your language version of the article after each week's translation is finished so that all languages are linked to each other.)


  About · Nominate/Review · Subscribe/Unsubscribe · Global message delivery --MediaWiki message delivery (talk) 02:44, 1 July 2024 (UTC)Reply

Tech News: 2024-27

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MediaWiki message delivery 23:59, 1 July 2024 (UTC)Reply

Wikipedia translation of the week: 2024-28

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The India naming dispute in 1947 refers to the argument over the use of the name India during and after the partition of British Raj, between the countries of Pakistan and the Republic of India. This dispute involved key figures such as Lord Mountbatten, the last Viceroy of British Raj, and Muhammad Ali Jinnah, the leader of the Muslim League and a founder of Pakistan. By 1947, the British Raj was going to be divided into two new nation states – Hindustan and Pakistan. Jinnah was initially convinced that Hindustan would not use the term India, since it lacked indigenous pedigree, etymologically and historically India meant the Indus Valley (modern-Pakistan). He also opposed the use of the name India as it would cause confusion regarding history. The disagreement had significant implications for national identity and international recognition.

(Please update the interwiki links on Wikidata of your language version of the article after each week's translation is finished so that all languages are linked to each other.)


  About · Nominate/Review · Subscribe/Unsubscribe · Global message delivery --MediaWiki message delivery (talk) 02:13, 8 July 2024 (UTC)Reply

Tech News: 2024-28

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MediaWiki message delivery 21:32, 8 July 2024 (UTC)Reply

This Month in GLAM: June 2024

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